voting

Kenya is gearing up for what will no doubt be a contentious presidential election this August.

Consider it another Trump flip-flop: back in October, Donald Trump told a crowd, "I will totally accept the results of this great and historic presidential election, if I win."

A lot of criticism has been aired about the Electoral College since Donald Trump won the presidency - even though he got fewer votes than Hillary Clinton. There have been moves to abolish the College. WUSF's Steve Newborn talks with PolitiFact Florida's Katie Sanders about one way that could happen.

Two weeks after Election Day, Hillary Clinton leads President-elect Donald Trump by 1.75 million votes. Despite Clinton's popular vote lead, Trump will move into the White House because he won the Electoral College.

Clinton's margin will grow in the coming weeks — mostly because of California, where there are still more than 2 million unprocessed ballots.

Two weeks after the presidential election, Florida has published official returns. But not every name voters wrote on their ballots will appear on those reports.

Election night is going to be information overload. We wanted to provide an easy-to-use guide of which counties to keep tabs on that could tell you how states might vote that are crucial to the election.

So we took 15 of the states where this election has been hotly waged and identified one county in each that has gone with the winner or closely reflected the statewide margin in each. We tried to pick counties that had a large enough population to matter some — or if they just had a knack for picking that statewide winner.

Colorofchangepac.org

The Color of Change political action committee (PAC) has launched #VotingWhileBlack, a program to engage black voters in races that may have the strongest impact on their communities.

PAC Director Arisha Hatch says elected officials often pursue black voters then forget about black communities once they take office. So the program is designed to hold politicians accountable for promises made on the campaign trail.

When Estelle Schultz, 98, sealed her ballot for the 2016 election, she wanted to snap a photo to commemorate.

She sent it to her granddaughter Sarah Benor, who says she was moved to post the picture on Facebook. Like many posts during this election, it went viral.

Here's a little information that Americans have usually been able to ignore.

It's about the Electoral College, a uniquely American institution that's been with us from the beginning and that's occasionally given us fits.

Typically, the Electoral College meets and does its thing a month or so after the election, and few people even notice or care. Once in a while, though, people do notice and do care — a lot.

Will 2016 be one of those years?

It's not something reasonable people would hope for, but it cannot be ruled out.

First, the basics.

El Nuevo Herald

There has been a lot of talk of "rigged elections" or "voter fraud" circulating within the electorate in this election Nevertheless, as of today (Monday, Nov. 4) the number of Floridians who have already voted is more than five million.

Christina White, the Supervisor of Elections in Miami-Dade County, says there is no need for fear of voter fraud because the system is built to protect against it. She shares her thoughts on why voters can feel secure, as well as what people can expect on Election Day.

Ahead of Election Day next week, election officials around the country are checking and double-checking their equipment to make sure the results are calculated accurately.

Those officials are under increased scrutiny this year with Donald Trump and his allies claiming the voting system could be "rigged" in favor of Democrats. So election administrators around the country are opening the doors to the public to show off the multiple layers of safeguards in the ballot-counting process.

Thinking of memorializing your vote for the upcoming presidential election? You might want to think twice about that.

Florida is one of 18 states where it's illegal to take a selfie with your mail-in ballot or while you're in the voting booth.

A judge has ruled that Broward County's elections supervisor was doing enough to warn voters about a potential problem with the medical marijuana referendum on their ballots.


Credit Mark Hedden / WLRN

This week on The Florida Roundup...

The State of Florida has budgeted about 12 million dollars to help Miami-Dade County in its efforts to battle Zika and the Aedes aegypti mosquito. Now, Florida's Surgeon General is requesting a comprehensive Zika action plan from the county to detail spending. Mayor Gimenez says he will comply. Does this signify a rift between the state and the county? WLRN's Sammy Mack and The Miami Herald's Daniel Chang fill us in on the latest.

Listen here: 

Speaking at a rally in Tampa, Fla., on Wednesday, Hillary Clinton told the story of a leukemia patient named Steven who "ditched his oxygen tank," as Clinton told it, to vote early.

"If Steven can do that, nobody has any excuses," she chided the crowd.

The Clinton camp is putting a hard push on to turn out the vote before Nov. 8. The number of people taking advantage of early voting could hit record levels this year. Here's a primer on early voting:

1. How many people will vote early this year?

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