Venezuela

Venezuelan flag at full staff
Manny Navarro / Miami Herald

Venezuela's national baseball team was warming up ahead of Tuesday evening's exhibition game against the Miami Marlins in Jupiter, Fla., when news arrived that President Hugo Chavez had died.

A fiery leftist, Hugo Chavez was a steadfast ally of dictators like Cuba's Fidel Castro while loudly opposing the United States. He claimed capitalism was destroying the world and tried to transform Venezuela into a socialist state. Millions of Venezuelans loved him because he showered the poor with social programs.

C. DiMattei

It was busier than usual inside Café Canela last night, but owner Ramon Peraza repeatedly came out from behind the counter to give new arrivals a hug or a handshake. All of them were jubilant.

But Peraza struggles to describe his emotions.

“I feel that my heart is very, very happy and quiet, quiet. We are waiting for this for many years,” says Peraza

When Peraza says the word “quiet,” he makes a soothing gesture over his chest. 

Venezuela's President Hugo Chávez, has died, Vice President Nicolás Maduro announced in a televised statement.

Chávez died at a military hospital in Caracas at 4:25 p.m. Tuesday. He was 58.

In power since 1999, the former military commander became an icon of socialist policies in Latin America. With his country's oil wealth as backup, he launched fierce and unyielding criticism of the United States and its allies.

The AP reports:

The Venezuelan government has released photographs of ailing President Hugo Chávez, who has not made a public appearance since he left for Cuba in December.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/www_ukberri_net/7644910450/
cc-by Valter Campanato - Agencia Brasil.

With an ailing Hugo Chavez still in Cuba, and perhaps on his deathbed, hundreds of thousands of Venezuelans now living in South Florida are anxiously awaiting word of what happens next.

El Arepazo 2 on N.W. 79th Avenue in Doral is their unofficial headquarters.

Inside the restaurant, the walls are covered with major league baseball cards, honoring players from Venezuela's most popular sport, such as reigning MVP Miguel Cabrera and Hall of Famer Luis Aparicio.

waterdotorg

On The Florida Roundup:  Saturday marks the third anniversary of the earthquake in Haiti.  How has it affected us in South Florida, home to the nation’s largest Haitian diaspora?   We take your calls on what you have seen in Haiti and what responsibility we have to this country less than 700 miles away.   Why has development been so slow after so many promises?

In the Bolivar Plaza of downtown Caracas, supporters of Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez arrive carrying photographs of their leader and singing songs urging him on. Music blares from loudspeakers, repeating over and over, "Chavez, my commander, is here to stay."

Chavez, however, is most definitely not here, and increasingly many Venezuelans wonder if he'll ever be back. He flew to Cuba, Venezuela's closest ally, for an operation that took place on Dec. 11. Before leaving for his fourth cancer surgery, Chavez named a successor.

Venezuelans must prepare for "complex and difficult days" after President Hugo Chavez' cancer surgery, the country's vice president says.

Deb Acosta

There's one more presidential debate left, and it takes place in the most crucial swing state of them all.  Host Phil Latzman along with panel of journalists, politicians and an academic discuss U.S. foreign policy and domestic issues important to Florida voters.  

Florida resident Ricardo Devengoechea had what the Venezuelans needed: an actual lock of Simón Bolivar's hair that could be used to authenticate the bones stashed in Caracas' National Pantheon.  Reportedly, he lent them the hair, the match was made and Bolívar's certified skull was used to make the  digital facial image that you see on this page.

How Education Figures Into The Presidential Race

Oct 12, 2012
cdsessums

On this week's show: we focus on education and compare the policies of the presidential candidates.  

President Obama and Mitt Romney agree on issues such as paying teachers based on student performance.  The main difference between the two is on the question of vouchers.  

More fallout from the Venezuelan election. A real estate agent tells the Miami Herald's Alfonso Chardy there's nothing like fear to touch off capital flight.

President Hugo Chávez’s reelection could prompt a further exodus of Venezuelans to South Florida, leading more entrepreneurs to seek U.S. green cards in return for investments and more people to buy properties from Key Biscayne to Weston, real estate agents and immigration attorneys said Tuesday.

NEWSCAST: South Florida Reacts To Chavez

Oct 9, 2012
CIA World FactBook

Venezuelans living in South Florida are reacting to the reelection of Hugo Chavez and the Florida Board of Education is meeting today in Orlando. 

Check out these stories and more in WLRN Miami Herald News.

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