U.S. Supreme Court

The cellphone video is vivid. A Border Patrol agent aims his gun at an unarmed 15-year-old some 60 feet away, across the border with Mexico, and shoots him dead.

On Tuesday, the U.S. Supreme Court hears arguments in a case testing whether the family of the dead boy can sue the agent for damages in the U.S.

Between 2005 and 2013, there were 42 such cross-border shootings, a dramatic increase over earlier times.

A judicial official sided with Georgia in a decades-long dispute over water rights with Florida on Tuesday, recommending that the U.S. Supreme Court refuse Florida's high-stakes request to cap water use by its neighboring state.

President Trump has selected federal appeals court Judge Neil Gorsuch to fill a Supreme Court seat that has sat vacant for nearly a year, setting up a blockbuster confirmation hearing that could put the new White House's domestic political agenda on trial in the U.S. Senate.

President Trump has made his pick to fill the ninth seat on the Supreme Court.

So now what?

President Trump is set to announce his pick for the U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday, fulfilling a promise he made to social conservatives on the campaign trail to name someone like the late Justice Antonin Scalia, a conservative icon whose seat has been vacant for almost a year.

In elementary school, you learn there are three branches of the federal government. But if you had looked on the new Donald Trump White House website before Monday morning, you would have only seen two: the executive and legislative.

President Trump says he plans to announce his pick for the U.S. Supreme Court next week.

The Trump administration has begun to float specific names for the high court's vacancy. The consensus seems to be that among the finalists on Trump's shortlist are Neil Gorsuch, a judge on the federal appeals court based in Denver; Judge William H. Pryor Jr. of Alabama, who served on the federal appeals court based in Atlanta; and Judge Thomas Hardiman of Pittsburgh, who serves on the 3rd Circuit Federal Court of Appeals.

The sometimes raucous presidential debates gave plenty of fodder to fact-checkers in 2016. So it's no surprise that the Top Five most-viewed rulings from PolitiFact Florida revolve around claims made by the candidates. WUSF's Steve Newborn takes a look at them with PolitiFact's Josh Gillin.

In honor of the end of 2016, we take this look at the Top 5 most-clicked stories of the year from PolitiFact Florida:

Court Opens Door To New Death Penalty Hearings

Dec 23, 2016

In a pair of major rulings about the state's embattled death penalty, the Florida Supreme Court on Thursday cleared the way for about half of the state's Death Row inmates to seek new sentencing proceedings based on a seminal U.S. Supreme Court decision early this year.

Justice Breyer Criticizes Florida Death Penalty Case

Dec 13, 2016

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday refused to take up a Death Row inmate's appeal in the 4-decade-old murder of an Orlando car salesman — but Justice Stephen Breyer used the case to raise broader questions about the death penalty.

Creative Commons Via Flickr
BasicGov (https://flic.kr/p/75SL1P)

Can the city of Miami sue big banks that issued its residents predatory housing loans?

That question landed lawyers for the city of Miami in front of the Unites States Supreme Court Tuesday, making their case that before the Great Recession banks gave predatory loans to black and Latino residents in violation of the Fair Housing Act, costing the city money.

South Florida was one of the hardest hit areas during the recession and Miami wants to recoup some of its losses, filing suit in 2013.

A trial over a 26-year water fight between Florida and Georgia is underway before the U.S. Supreme Court.  A special master appointed by the court began hearing arguments Monday. 

At the Supreme Court on Monday, the justices heard arguments in the case of a girl with disabilities, her service dog and the school that barred the dog from the premises.

Ehlena Fry was born with cerebral palsy, which significantly limits her mobility but not her cognitive skills. So when she was about to enter kindergarten in Napoleon, Mich., her parents got a trained service dog — a white furry goldendoodle, named Wonder.

With the presidential election just five weeks away, all discussions about the U.S. Supreme Court focus on the unfilled vacancy created by the death of Justice Antonin Scalia, and the likelihood of more vacancies to come. Speculation about the most likely justice to retire centers on 83-year-old Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. But in an interview with NPR, she didn't sound like a woman eager to retire.

Florida Supreme Court Justice Charles Canady is on Republican Presidential Candidate Donald Trump’s short list for appointment to the U.S. Supreme Court.

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