University of Miami

Flickr / Ministerio de Cultura de la Nación

Argentina is no stranger to financial crisis. But an unprecedented drama is playing out there this summer, one that could alter the rules in global debt markets – and boost the sales in South Florida condo markets, as more Argentines look for safer places to put their money amid the turmoil.

At issue is $100 billion: the mountain of sovereign debt Argentina defaulted on in 2001 amid a horrific economic collapse. It was the largest default in history.

Patrick Farrell / Miami Herald staff

  In Gov. Rick Scott's budget, the Legislature approved $60 million of annual funding for three cancer centers in Florida. One of the centers, the Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center at the University of Miami School of Medicine, will receive $16 million per year for five years.

Even before the funding the center made investments including hiring new physicians and researchers, and purchasing new equipment.

As Dr. Stephen Nimer says, the new personnel and machines help make the center "world class."

Al Diaz / Miami Herald Staff

The University of Miami Hurricanes have had trouble filling Sun Life Stadium in the past. It is far away from campus, and attendance often does not fill even the lower bowl. So the marketing team at the athletics department tried something a little unconventional: They created an ad calling on fans to "GO TO FEWER GAMES."

The Last Sunday Afternoon Of Music In Miami

May 28, 2014
Courtesy of Sunday Afternoons of Music

After 33 years, Miami's classical music series Sunday Afternoons of Music has seen its final afternoon. 

The event was founded by husband and wife Byron Krulewitch and Doreen Marx. They brought artists from all around the world to South Florida. Each season had seven shows for children and seven shows for adults. 

Lisann Ramos

 

Frost School of Music performers teamed up with otolaryngologists from the University of Miami's medical school for on-campus concerts on World Voice Day, April 16.

The day-long event was planned by UM's otolaryngology department to highlight the importance of vocal health. After the concerts, UM held classes for vocalists incorporating yoga techniques.

 

Forty-nine countries celebrated Voice Day worldwide. A few cities host Voice Day flash mobs, fundraisers and, of course, radio programs.

 

Jessica Meszaros / WLRN

Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton paid University of Miami students a visit on Wednesday evening. She is a long-time friend of UM president Donna Shalala, and came to talk to her students about being an active generation. 

  Clinton said she wants the students to be a true "participation generation" and continue volunteering for worthy causes.

She says "it is the work of this century to complete the unfinished business" of her generation, regarding human rights and equality. 

Jimmy Katz / Nonesuch

Fifty years ago Sunday the Beatles played the Ed Sullivan show. That means it's been 50 years since kids all over the country put down their band instruments and picked up the electric guitar. Pat Metheny was one of them, and because of that, in a way, the Beatles are responsible for an important chapter of jazz history. So is Metheny's older brother, who introduced him to Miles Davis, which led him down the road of his own continually evolving brand of improvisation. 

Pietro Cremone / Courtesy UM's Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science

It's not easy to get an amazing shot of marine animals or an arresting fish photo when you're in over your head and trolling camera equipment. But each spring, hopeful amateur snappers from around the globe enter the Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science's annual underwater-photography contest.

And each year, the winning photos are breathtaking. This year's fan favorite is of a pair of amorous dragonets. Even their name titillates.

What To Make Of All Those Sea-Level Rise Projections

Nov 13, 2013
NOAA

Climate scientists largely agree that sea level is rising. The extent of the change is a far more complicated matter.

“Probably two feet. Three feet, possibly,” said David Enfield, a climatologist with the University of Miami and the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration. “As an extreme -- if for example we see an unexpected acceleration of the melting ice in Greenland and Antarctica, something else we’re not observing -- we could be seeing six feet by the end of the century.”

What The UM Scandal Says About College Athletics

Oct 25, 2013

On The Florida Roundup: we look at the University of Miami’s punishment by the NCAA and the role of student athletes in the big money game of college sports with guests Billy Corben of Rakontur Films and Michelle Kaufman of the Miami Herald.

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