University of Miami

At The U, An MBA For The NFL

Apr 7, 2015
Kenny Malone

Grad student Torrey Smith didn’t really drink coffee before he started his master's in business administration at the University of Miami.

“Now I’ve had to try it a few times and step outside of my box because these long hours catch up to you,” the 26-year-old Smith says.

It’s not like Smith isn’t used to a high-stakes, rigorous schedule. He’s won a Super Bowl, caught 30 touchdown passes and just signed a $40 million contract with the San Francisco 49ers.

Gort Productions

The Florida Legislature is debating on whether to expand Medicaid. About two weeks ago, the Senate overwhelmingly approved a bill that would expand health care coverage to about 800,000 low-income Floridians using billions in federal dollars.

And the U.S. Centers For Medicare and Medicaid Services would have to grant the state a waiver to get the federal funds.

The University of Miami School of Business hosted its yearly health care conference Monday. The main topic of discussion was “disruptive innovation,” which organizer and professor Steven Ullmann says means "to disrupt how we do health care provision in this country."

Ullmann says the health care system now is fragmented, and that makes it expensive.

Tim Padgett / WLRN

Haiti is no stranger to trauma – as we were reminded on Tuesday, when a power-line accident and the ensuing panic killed 16 people during Carnival celebrations in Port-au-Prince.

The Debate Over Richmond Pine Rockland

Jan 23, 2015
Jessica Meszaros / WLRN

Protesters gathered at the Zoo Miami parking lot this past weekend to rally against development on Richmond Pine Rockland that neighbors the zoo. It’s one of the last intact pine rocklands in Miami-Dade County.

As far as I’m concerned, one of the year’s most important Latin American stories happened this week in China.

Yep, communist China. On Monday the government’s Internet watchdragon, known as the Great Firewall, pulled the plug on Gmail because it's a subversive instrument of free speech and dissent.

In the process, Beijing affirmed President Obama’s historic decision this month to pursue a policy of engagement with communist Cuba.

President Obama Delays Immigration Action

Sep 12, 2014

On the Florida Roundup, President Obama will not take executive action on immigration until after the midterm elections, breaking a pledge he made in June. We will discuss how this will affect votes in our swing state.

JD Lasica / Flickr

University of Miami president Donna Shalala says she’s stepping down next year from the job she’s held since 2001.

Shalala came to the university after leading the federal health agency for eight years and serving as chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

 She helped build the national stature of the school's medical school and hospital and increased research budgets.

Frank Nero, former head of the Beacon Council, says even big businessmen were impressed by Shalala


“It was always a big deal," he says.

Flickr / Ministerio de Cultura de la Nación

Argentina is no stranger to financial crisis. But an unprecedented drama is playing out there this summer, one that could alter the rules in global debt markets – and boost the sales in South Florida condo markets, as more Argentines look for safer places to put their money amid the turmoil.

At issue is $100 billion: the mountain of sovereign debt Argentina defaulted on in 2001 amid a horrific economic collapse. It was the largest default in history.

Patrick Farrell / Miami Herald staff

  In Gov. Rick Scott's budget, the Legislature approved $60 million of annual funding for three cancer centers in Florida. One of the centers, the Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center at the University of Miami School of Medicine, will receive $16 million per year for five years.

Even before the funding the center made investments including hiring new physicians and researchers, and purchasing new equipment.

As Dr. Stephen Nimer says, the new personnel and machines help make the center "world class."

Al Diaz / Miami Herald Staff

The University of Miami Hurricanes have had trouble filling Sun Life Stadium in the past. It is far away from campus, and attendance often does not fill even the lower bowl. So the marketing team at the athletics department tried something a little unconventional: They created an ad calling on fans to "GO TO FEWER GAMES."

The Last Sunday Afternoon Of Music In Miami

May 28, 2014
Courtesy of Sunday Afternoons of Music

After 33 years, Miami's classical music series Sunday Afternoons of Music has seen its final afternoon. 

The event was founded by husband and wife Byron Krulewitch and Doreen Marx. They brought artists from all around the world to South Florida. Each season had seven shows for children and seven shows for adults. 

Lisann Ramos


Frost School of Music performers teamed up with otolaryngologists from the University of Miami's medical school for on-campus concerts on World Voice Day, April 16.

The day-long event was planned by UM's otolaryngology department to highlight the importance of vocal health. After the concerts, UM held classes for vocalists incorporating yoga techniques.


Forty-nine countries celebrated Voice Day worldwide. A few cities host Voice Day flash mobs, fundraisers and, of course, radio programs.


Jessica Meszaros / WLRN

Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton paid University of Miami students a visit on Wednesday evening. She is a long-time friend of UM president Donna Shalala, and came to talk to her students about being an active generation. 

  Clinton said she wants the students to be a true "participation generation" and continue volunteering for worthy causes.

She says "it is the work of this century to complete the unfinished business" of her generation, regarding human rights and equality. 

Jimmy Katz / Nonesuch

Fifty years ago Sunday the Beatles played the Ed Sullivan show. That means it's been 50 years since kids all over the country put down their band instruments and picked up the electric guitar. Pat Metheny was one of them, and because of that, in a way, the Beatles are responsible for an important chapter of jazz history. So is Metheny's older brother, who introduced him to Miles Davis, which led him down the road of his own continually evolving brand of improvisation.