University of Miami

Secretaria de Seguridad Publica de Tamaulipas

In June, Mexican freelance reporter Zamira Esther Bautista was gunned down by a group of hit men at her home in Ciudad Victoria, Mexico.

Her killing has yet to be solved; no one has been arrested.

It was the most recent murder of a journalist in Mexico – the eighth there this year. Across Latin America, 23 journalists have been murdered.

That’s a big reason media rights groups this month are urging the U.N. to create a special representative for journalists’ protection.

New online ecology of adversarial aggregates: ISIS and beyond


The ability to predict when talks of terrorism on social media will manifest into attacks is one step closer to reality.


A University of Miami team of physicists published a study in the journal Science describing a mathematical algorithm that takes a new approach to monitor ISIS conversations online and can help predict possible attacks.


The University of Miami is on the verge of setting a new precedent in religious studies. It’s introducing an Atheism Chair to its faculty.


Retired businessman Louis Appignani donated $2.2 million in April to endow what is said to be the nation’s first academic chair for the study of atheism, humanism and secular ethics, according to the New York Times.


Florida's Coral Getting Help From Hundreds Of Miles Away

Mar 4, 2016
James St. John / Wikimedia Commons

Some coral in the Florida Keys are breeding with coral 1,000 miles away more than they are with coral on the very same reef, according to a new study from the University of Miami.

Tim Padgett /

Mario Stevenson is a respected virus expert. He heads the infectious diseases division at the University of Miami’s Miller School of Medicine. He’s done pioneering research on HIV.

But until last year he’d barely registered Zika.

“Four months ago,” Stevenson told me, “I thought Zika was an Italian football player.”

He’s since learned Zika is a mosquito-borne virus – one that’s marauding so badly throughout Latin America and the Caribbean that the World Health Organization this week declared it a global health emergency.

UM President Julio Frenk Inaugurated

Jan 29, 2016
Kate Stein / WLRN

The University of Miami inaugurated Dr. Julio Frenk as its new president on Friday, positioning the internationally known public health expert to begin implementing his plans for the university's future.

Wilson Sayre / WLRN

Sherice Bennett is a caretaker.

She takes care of her sister who has cerebral palsy. She had two sons, two dogs and she still has the tank that used to house her turtle and fish.

It’s a role she happily fills on top of the other roles she’s taken on over the years: call center coordinator, caterer, accounts payable, executive secretary and, when that failed, school bus and truck driver.

Luis Hernandez / WLRN

There's a disturbing reality about college life today. Roughly one in four students, predominantly women, will become victims of some form of sexual assault, according to a new survey.

"Human Trafficking in the United States and Elevating the Issue to a Public Health Priority" public forum at the University of Miami.
Alyssa Méndez Batista

  The University of Miami held a public forum on Tuesday about human trafficking in the United States.


Survivors, researchers and government officials were there. Part of the discussion was about treating human trafficking as a public health issue. The idea is to encourage medical and community involvement to identify possible victims.


C.W. Griffin / Miami Herald Staff

Maybe you're a college football fan. If you are, regardless of your team loyalty, you understand all that goes with fandom: the ecstasy of winning, the despair of losing and everything in between. You own a T-shirt or jersey or cap, at the least. You may even go as far as painting your face, maybe your whole body, to the games.

Raisa Milian / WLRN

One of the most influential voices in public broadcasting has a message for University of Miami students: “Get involved!”

PBS President and CEO Paula Kerger visited the university as part of the School of Communication’s annual “Conversation” series.

During her discussion on the role of public media in the digital age, Kerger’s biggest piece of advice to students is to get involved in the community as citizens and volunteers.

Sarah Bennet, a public relations student, says she felt very inspired after Kerger’s talk.

Caribbean Institute for Meteorology and Hydrology

Remember Hurricane Danny roaring out in the Atlantic last week with 115-mile-an-hour gusts? When it reached Puerto Rico this morning it was wheezing.

That’s a big relief for the Caribbean islands – but it also reflects a big problem out there.

The same abnormal climate conditions that helped deflate Danny are also responsible for the some of the worst drought the Caribbean has seen in two decades.

RELATED: The Danger Of Hurricane Complacency

How The University Of Miami Uses Art To Train Future Doctors

Jul 29, 2015
UM Lowe Art Museum / Courtesy

The University of Miami is adding Baroque paintings and Greek vases to its diagnostic arsenal.

Medical, nursing and physical therapy students at UM are supplementing their clinical training with visits to the Lowe Art Museum at the university’s Coral Gables campus. There, they discuss works of art in small groups and make connections to health care.

Hope Torrents, the Lowe’s school programs coordinator, calls these visits the Fine Art of Health Care. She runs the workshops, which began in 2008.

Creative Commons

A new map created by the the University of Miami's Office of Civic and Community Engagement hopes not only to show where affordable housing is located but also some of the different demographic information that may be driving its placement.

Gustave Dore / Wikimedia Commons

En un lugar de la Mancha, de cuyo nombre no quiero acordarme...

Somewhere in La Mancha, in a place whose name I do not care to remember...

-opening to "Don Quixote"

Anyone who’s grown up under communism can appreciate Cuban émigré Erisbel Tavio’s taste in books.

To survive totalitarian governments, and occasionally stand up to them, it helps to be a little insane. And there’s no more heroic nut in all of literature than Don Quixote, the protagonist of the classic novel of the same name by Spanish author Miguel Cervantes.