Under the Sun

Oars Away!

Apr 16, 2012
Jose Iglesias, El Nuevo Herald

Terence Cantarella, WLRN’s intrepid waterway explorer, has begun his four day journey through the city’s canals this morning.

Bringing Clarity To Miami’s Murky Canals

Apr 12, 2012

This Monday when WLRN announced that contributor Terence Cantarella will embark on a historic voyage next Monday to circumnavigate Miami’s canal systems via canoe, we got a flood of feedback from our audience. Mostly urban legends.  Oral tradition and fear of the unknown  have long informed some of us that creepy things are hiding in the murky waters.  For a city that prides itself on being on the water, it seems that water is limited to Miami Beach for some.

There’s Fish In Them There Canals

Apr 11, 2012
Florida State Archives

We asked you about your experiences with Miami-Dade’s canals.  A couple of people wrote in on Twitter to tell us about some of the fish they’ve caught for sport in the waterways.  @Vice-Queen Maria mentioned peacock bass.

Marice Cohn Band / The Miami Herald

Ruth Greenfield was a music teacher and a maverick. In the segregated 1950s and 60s, she ran a Miami arts school that included students and teachers from all racial backgrounds–even if she had to teach in a Masonic lodge or in a funeral home.  She came from a privileged background and was able to study music in Paris, where people of all kinds interacted more freely.

 

Marice Cohn Band / The Miami Herald

 Ruth Greenfield was a music teacher and a maverick. In the segregated 1950s and 60s, she ran a Miami arts school that included students and teachers from all racial backgrounds–even if she had to teach in a Masonic lodge or in a funeral home.  She came from a privileged background and was able to study music in Paris, where people of all kinds interacted more freely.

 

Marice Cohn Band / The Miami Herald

Ruth Greenfield was a music teacher and a maverick. In the segregated 1950s and 60s, she ran a Miami arts school that included students and teachers from all racial backgrounds–even if she had to teach in a Masonic lodge or in a funeral home.  

She came from a privileged background and was able to study music in Paris, where people of all kinds interacted more freely.

What’s The Canoe Project?

Apr 9, 2012
Jeffrey Martinez

The canal system of Miami-Dade County is the unrecognized backdrop to millions of lives. The canals run across every corner of the county, yet many people have no idea where they lead or what their purpose is.  Most people drive or walk past them without paying them any attention.

All that’s about to change.

Monroe County Sheriff's Office

Mark Hedden lives in Key West and writes narrative nonfiction, primarily ornithology-oriented natural history, which most people refer to as “stuff about birds.” Along with the strange business of bank robbery in Key West, he has written about necrovoyeurism, his love of the Tour de France, his aversion to pirates, his hatred of clowns, the inappropriate use of firearms during photo shoots, and music.

Sammy Mack

Fifty years ago, developers dreamed of turning a collection of isolated islands in the middle of Biscayne Bay into a resort destination. This year, the dream of Islandia quietly died.  The Miami-Dade County Commission stripped Islandia’s status as a city. In essence, they voted Islandia out of existence.

The city of Islandia is on Elliot Key. It was never populated by more than a hundred people.  Now the only people who live in Islandia are park rangers.

Interview: Jad Abumrad Of Radiolab

Feb 1, 2012
Radiolab

Thanks to those of you who submitted questions and suggestions for WLRN Miami Herald News director Dan Grech’s interview with Radiolab host Jad Abumrad.

We were able to use several of your questions and suggestions.

Lost Between Two Nations

Jan 11, 2012
Jacob Kushner

When an earthquake struck Haiti in January 2010, the United States stopped deporting Haitian immigrants to the devastated nation. But deportations resumed last January, and Franco Coby, 24, of Fort Myers, found himself banished from the country he grew up in since the age of 6.

Yucel Tellici/stock.xchang

Diana Abu-Jaber read her essay for Under the Sun about her family’s heritage of hosting guests during the holidays.  Here are a few recipes you might want to add to your holiday table.  One is more elaborate–perhaps for a host to serve.  The other is super simple–perhaps something a guest can contribute to a party.  These recipes are from Abu-Jaber’s memoir, The Language of Baklava (Pantheon Books).

POETIC BAKLAVA

Diana Abu-Jaber On Sharing The Table During The Holidays

Dec 14, 2011
Diana Abu-Jaber

For many of us, cooking for a holiday feast or making preparations for a party are well worn and beloved holiday routines.  All of that hosting can also be exhausting!  Listen to author Diana Abu-Jaber read her essay on her family’s heritage of hosting guests during the holidays.

How Wilton Manors Came Out

Dec 8, 2011
Kenny Malone

It used to be that Key West, Victoria Park and South Beach were the centers of gay life in South Florida.  Over the last decade, this tiny town of about 12,000 people, just outside of Fort Lauderdale – has taken over.  Wilton Manors has more same-sex couples per capita than anyplace but Provincetown, Massachusetts. The latest census numbers got screwed up, but by some estimates, 40% of the population is gay.

An Excerpt From The Hatmakers And The Heron Master

Oct 19, 2011
Trina Sargalski

Michael Keller is the author of a graphic novel adaptation of Charles Darwin’s Origin of Species. He is working on a historical novel, The Hatmakers and the Heron Master, about hat-makers, wading birds and Florida’s early settlement. Below is an excerpt from his latest book:

1893.

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