Under the Sun

The Green Blotch: Hurricane Andrew Through A Six-Year-Old's Eyes

Jul 12, 2012
Danny Rivero

Danny Rivero is our social media editor here at WLRN. You don’t hear his voice on the radio, but Danny’s is the voice of WLRN on TwitterFacebook, and Tumblr.

My Mother's Hands

Jul 6, 2012
Geoffrey Philp

Geoffrey Philp shared his story and poem about an old transistor radio with Kenny Malone on WLRN.  Philp inherited that radio from his mother, who carried it with her from home to home, even as they moved in Jamaica and later, around Florida.

It was the radio he listened to during Hurricane Andrew. Even though the radio no longer works, Philp can’t bring himself to get rid of it.

Philp is a poet, novelist, playwright and English professor at Miami-Dade College. Below is an homage he wrote to his mother.

My Mother’s Hands
 by Geoffrey Philp

Jacqueline Reyna

The NBA Finals have turned the nation’s attention–and cameras– toward Miami and Miami Beach. As the Miami Heat try to clinch the finals, Jordan Melnick wants to remind us all that there’s more to Miami than South Beach. It all started with these words by LeBron James: “In this fall–this is very tough–in this fall I’m going to take my talents to South Beach and join the Miami Heat.”

Fiction: Dolphins, Oysters And Crabs

Jun 5, 2012
Claudio Baglietto

Jeremy Glazer writes about that weird liminal space between high school graduation and supposed adulthood. It’s set against the backdrop of Key Biscayne. Glazer is a Miami native who lives and writes on Miami Beach. He can be reached at jeremyglazer@yahoo.com.

Click on the player above to listen to Glazer’s latest work of original fiction.

The songs you heard in this piece were “Aurora” and “Comienzos” by Miami band Arboles Libres.

Childhood Memories And A Hialeah Landmark

Jun 4, 2012
Manuel Alen Jr.

Producer and Miami Herald multimedia journalist Michael Alen has long been fascinated with a strange building in the middle of Hialeah. Alen remembers seeing the building as a toddler on his drives home from Kendall with his parents. He remembers being awestruck, each and every time, by its rounded shape and how it contrasted with the sharp edges of its neighboring structures.

Salsa Lessons

May 17, 2012
Laura Isensee

Music teacher Mario Ortiz has been teaching classic salsa tunes to elementary and middle school students for 14 years.  Outside the classroom, Mario plays trumpet in a salsa group. He learned music from his father, who was also named Mario Ortiz.

The elder Ortiz was a well known salsa bandleader (for the Mario Ortiz All Star Band)  in Puerto Rico in the 1960s.  He died in 1999.

Taking The Plunge

May 9, 2012
Alicia Zuckerman

UPDATE  June 6, 2013 14:43 p.m.: (AP) Esther Williams, the swimming champion turned actress who starred in glittering and aquatic Technicolor musicals of the 1940s and 1950s, has died. She was 91.

Williams died early Thursday in her sleep, according to her longtime publicist Harlan Boll.

Following in the footsteps of Sonja Henie, who went from skating champion to movie star, Williams became one of Hollywood's biggest moneymakers, appearing in spectacular swimsuit numbers that capitalized on her wholesome beauty and perfect figure.

 

Curses, Criminals And Canals

May 4, 2012
Kenny Malone

Years ago, Terence Cantarella had the idea to navigate Miami-Dade’s canals via canoe.  He’s not an experienced paddler or an avid outdoorsman, but he wanted to seize a homegrown opportunity for adventure: “I wasn’t going to explore the world’s oceans like Jacques [Cousteau]. I don’t have the time or money for that. I was going to spend four days circumnavigating Miami-Dade county via the canals.”

Broward Canals Vs. Miami-Dade Canals

Apr 26, 2012
courtesy of Florida State Archives

As we mentioned yesterday, we’re switching gears a little in the Canoe Project and putting some focus on another city’s canal system: Miami’s neighbor, Fort Lauderdale.

David Samayoa

Yesterday evening at Scotty’s Landing, the WLRN Miami Herald News staff celebrated the end of the Canoe Project and welcomed Terence Cantarella back on dry land. WLRN Miami Herald News anchor Arianna Prothero led a Q & A with Terence about his journey.

Jose Iglesias, El Nuevo Herald

Terence Cantarella, the man behind WLRN’s Canoe Project, crossed multiple lanes of traffic yesterday– and Jose Iglesias of El Nuevo Herald got it all on video.

Sights And Sounds From Day Two Of The Canoe Project

Apr 17, 2012
Jose A. Iglesias for El Nuevo Herald

Listen to Terence Cantarella talk about what it is like to be canoeing through some of Miami’s canals by himself while also looking at some of the images he posted on Twitter earlier today.

Arnold Markowitz

Considering the amount of time we here at WLRN Miami Herald News have been talking about canals recently, due to our immersion into the Canoe Project, Arnold Markowitz, a listener, offered to us some information about an interesting characteristic of Miami canals: they have some pretty great fishing!

WLRN Miami Herald News reporter, Trina Sargalski, recently chatted with Arnold Markowitz, a local fishing expert here in Miami, about why he loves fishing in Miami’s canals.

El Nuevo Herald via YouTube

Jose Iglesias of El Nuevo Herald has put together some great videos featuring Terence Cantarella, the man behind the Canoe Project.

In these videos Terence shows us his route on a map, what he packed for his trip and how he gets around dams.

Watch below:

Meet Terence, The Man Behind The Canoe Project

Apr 16, 2012
Jose A. Iglesias for El Nuevo Herald

Most South Florida residents don’t have the luxury of flying to the Amazon when they have an urge for adventure.  Some might go to Shark Valley or drive up north for some good old-fashioned hiking, but if you are stuck in the city where can you get your fix?

Pages