Under the Sun

From Alien to Citizen

Mar 18, 2013
Courtesy of Chuck Felix / Freedigitalphotos.net

Immigration officials say there is an often an increase in the number of people applying for U.S. citizenship before a presidential election.

Former Under the Sun producer Ruth Morris is one of those immigrants who wants to become a citizen. For three years, Morris covered South Florida immigration, a beat that can earn you a slew of angry emails.  It can also make you cynical, according to Morris. Some of her readers got angry when she used the term “undocumented workers.” They preferred “illegal aliens.”

 

Who Has Navigated Our Canals?

Mar 18, 2013
Terence Cantarella via Twitter

Terence Cantarella, the man who is currently navigating his way around Miami by canoeing through Miami-Dade’s  canals, is not the first person to attempt something similar.

In fact, according to The Miami Herald newspaper archives, this is something that has even been attempted a few times before.

Here is are some stories of other Floridians who have traveled via Miami Canals:

End of the Line: Velvet Rope

Dec 4, 2012
Trina Sargalski

Love it or hate it, nightlife is huge here.  And one person determines whether you go home in shame or spend the night in glory.  The doorman.

We asked Under the Sun’s assistant producers, Trina Sargalski and Kenny Malone, to capture the drama of the Velvet Rope.  Little did they know, they’d get roped in, themselves.

Look here for an animated version of their adventure.

The Velvet Rope – Animated Version

Dec 4, 2012
Trina Sargalski

 

Editor Dan Grech assigned Assistant Producers Kenny Malone and Trina Sargalski to report a story about getting past the doorman at nightclubs.  With the detachment appropriate to their position, Kenny and Trina arrived at Club Space in downtown Miami ready to report on the velvet rope.

Bunny Yeager: "Sexy In a Nice Way"

Nov 16, 2012
Photo courtesy of Bunny Yeager

Whether we like it or not, South Florida is known for sun, beaches…and skin.   Back in the 1950s, pin-up model Bettie Page posed for some of her most classic photos here. Her black bangs, red lips and playful gaze were a hit in the pages of Playboy.  These images were created by local model turned photographer Bunny Yeager.  Clotilde Luce reported on the woman behind these icons of 1950s fashion and photography and her recent discovery by the art world.

Mt. Trashmore: This Place Is A Dump

Oct 9, 2012
Flora Thomson-DeVeaux

Intern Flora Thomson-DeVeaux grew up in a home where there was a lot of trash talk.

One Year After The Quake: “Las Twins”

Oct 3, 2012
Carmen Maria Romero

Carmen Maria Romero was one of the four medical workers in Haiti whose voices you heard in After the Quake: Patients and Healers. She’s a physical therapist who had already been volunteering in Haiti for ten years, and who traveled there last January to help with the relief efforts.

Romero was so moved by the suffering and the resilience of her patients that she decided to quit her job and relocate to Haiti.

Loyalty Oath

Oct 2, 2012
Florida State Archives

Journalist and  professor Madeleine Blais contemplates a move back to South Florida for a job teaching as a visiting professor at Florida International University.   As part of her employment paperwork, she’s asked to sign an oath of loyalty to the state of Florida.  As a journalist, this kind of thing makes her suspicious.  She reflects on her previous years in Miami as she contemplates signing the oath and moving back:

WLRN

Green Card Stories (Umbrage Books) is a collection of profiles and photographs of fifty immigrants from around the country by journalist Saundra Amrhein and photographer Ariana Lindquist.  Amrhein has been a journalist for seventeen years.  She spent ten years at the St. Petersburg Times (now the Tampa Bay Times.)  Immigrants profiled include a triathelete, a magician, a flea market worker, small business owners and executives.

What South Florida Cyclists and Drivers Have to Say to Each Other

Oct 1, 2012
Diego Quiros

This is a place that’s sunny, warm, and flat. It seems like it should be a pretty perfect place to ride a bike. It’s not.

Last month, the 36-year-old father, husband and amateur triathelte Aaron Cohen was hit and killed by a car while riding on the Rickenbacker Causeway. The tragedy revived a debate about how drivers and cyclists share—or don’t share—our roads.

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