Under the Sun

Alicia Zuckerman

It’s a time-honored tradition. Spring breakers descend on Miami from across the nation this time of year to guzzle beer, work on their tanlines and hit the clubs.


Or there’s Alternative Spring Break, where you sit in a windowless room, guzzle coffee, and fill out reams of immigration paperwork. You can compile proof of residence, and file for fee waivers. Sound appealing?

Sammy Mack

Give Good Works, a Wynwood thrift store and charity, gives your old and gently used items a second chance.  However, the point is to give people a second chance.  Jennifer Rousseau, who works at the store, transformed her life with the help of the shop’s founder Heather Klinker.

“A lot of people would have given up on us girls,” said Rousseau. “Heather didn’t. She kept going. She’s a hero to me. I love her.”

Human Hair Is Farmers’ Friend

Mar 18, 2013
Dan Grech

That’s according to Blair Blacker, and he should know.  In this story, host Dan Grech visits a warehouse in Florida City with Blacker to have a look at a novel product– mats made from human hair.  Blacker says the mats fertilize plants better than most herbicides, plus they prevent weeds and conserve water.  The circular mats, made by SmartGrow, fit snugly around a plant’s base and biodegrade over time.

Philadelphia Museum of Art, Purchased with funds contributed by Dorothy Norman, 1969, Photograph © Robert Frank, from The Americans

This photo of a forlorn, slightly bored young hotel elevator operator was taken on the beach in 1955, at the Sherry Frontenac Hotel (65th and Collins).  It has become one of Frank’s most famous photographs and the face of the exhibition, “Looking In:  Robert Frank’s the Americans” at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. It runs through Jan. 3.

Episode 4: Hispanic Versus Latino

Mar 18, 2013
Jose Maya

Dan Grech gets a government form in the mail and he’s asked to decide: Is he Hispanic, or “a big white guy?” He’s pretty sure he’s not Latino.

To sort it all out, he invited demographer Maria Aysa to the studio.

In this piece, she explains the difference between the terms Hispanic and Latino, and why some people are so adamant about using one instead of the other.

Ruth Morris

Books & Books bookstore owner Mitchell Kaplan speaks with award-winning author Edwidge Danticat about her experience as an Haitian immigrant living in Brooklyn, what it’s like to live in Miami now, and about writing the memoir

What’s Up With South Florida?: Inglish Gratis

Mar 18, 2013

In our regular What’s Up With South Florida? feature, you decide what we investigate.  You voted overwhelmingly for an explanation of the “Inglish Gratis” sign outside of Hialeah High.  This photo had been circulating virally through email.  It was brought to our attention by  photographer Tomas Loewy.  In Episode 3 of Under the Sun, Kenny Malone set out to solve the mystery of this misspelling. (-T.S.)

Funding for this episode provided by a grant from The Florida Humanities Council and the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Meet Poet Campbell McGrath

Mar 18, 2013
Dan Grech

When you see a book titled Florida Poems, you might imagine titles and verses about bright sunshine and sand-swept beaches, with a picturesque Key West sunset thrown in.  You know, kind of like the poetry version of those generic landscape paintings that hang in every Florida seaside motel? (With the exception of paintings by the Florida Highwaymen, but that’s another story for another time.)

Young Poets

Mar 18, 2013
Nick Vagnoni

Host Alicia Zuckerman was intensely curious about how young poets graduating with Masters of Fine Arts degrees expect to make money.  Since the average poetry journal pays just $20 for a poem, it’s not exactly a way to make a living.   Sure, writing by candlelight because you can’t pay FPL has a certain romance to it, but what happens when you run out of matches?  So how do poets expect to pay their bills?

Dinner Set Gang

Mar 18, 2013
Lyn Millner

The writer Somerset Maugham called Florida a “sunny place for shady people.”  A couple of decades before Bernard Madoff hit Palm Beach, a pair of cat burglars hit mansions up and down the coast.  Lyn Millner tells us where they are now.

 

Before becoming a jewel thief, Dominick Latella played guitar with a band called Two + Two in New York.  Here are some songs from the band’s record:

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