Under the Sun

Sara Shake

To launch our new investigative blog, What's the Story?, the WLRN-Miami Herald News team took over Fort Lauderdale's Riverside Market on Tuesday, April 22.

What's the Story is a reporting project in which we let your curiosity guide our investigations. You ask us a question, and we try to answer it. So tell us: What have you always wondered about South Florida?

Marice Cohn Band for The Miami Herald

Ruth Greenfield was a music teacher and a maverick. In the segregated 1950s and 60s, she ran a Miami arts school that included students and teachers from all racial backgrounds–even if she had to teach in a Masonic lodge or in a funeral home.  She came from a privileged background and was able to study music in Paris, where people of all kinds interacted more freely.

Coffee is more than a drink. For many of us — OK, for me — it's woven into the fabric of every day.

It also connects us to far corners of the globe.

For instance, every Friday, a truck pulls up to the warehouse of Counter Culture Coffee, a small roaster and coffee distributor in Durham, N.C., and unloads a bunch of heavy burlap sacks.

Read The Runners-Up (Amateur)

Mar 18, 2013
Susan Brown

In April, we invited unpublished writers to submit their work as part of our Write South Florida contest.   There were three categories in the contest: Amateur, College, and Children. These are the runners-up from the contest in the Amateur category.


by Susan Brown

I‘ve spent more of my life in water than on land.   Not surprising for a third generation fisherman, I ‘spose.  Probably explains why I jumped at the chance to live in the old fish house.  That, and the fact we got history.

End Of The Line: Postcard From Alabama Jack’s

Mar 18, 2013
Robert Lyle

If you follow U.S. 1 to the very end of the Florida peninsula, veer onto Card Sound Road, and make your way through the mangrove swamps, you’ll find it.  A wooden shanty with a roof but no walls: an open-air bar and restaurant.  It’s the very last place on the U.S. mainland.  And it’s called Alabama Jack’s.

Guerra de la Paz

If you’ve ever donated an old coat or a dress, or even pair of socks, to a thrift store, there’s a chance it ended up in the Saatchi Collection in London. That’s because the Miami-based duo, Guerra de la Paz, makes thrift store throwaways into art.

Alicia Zuckerman went with them to their “art supply store,” as they call it, so they could show her how come up with their creations.

Edwidge Danticat’s Letter To Miami

Mar 18, 2013
Trina Sargalski

This piece originally aired July 2011.

Florida State Archives.

Terence Cantarella launches on his four day Canoe Project exploration on Monday morning from near NE 69th St. and Biscayne Blvd. in Miami.

Nancy Klingener

June 20th was the official first day of summer, but  it’s felt like summer for weeks already.  Many of us dread the humid days when we can barely walk to our cars without breaking a sweat.  Writer Nancy Klingener has learned to appreciate summer and the off-season in Key West. Her full essay is below.

Nancy Klingener describes herself as “a recovering journalist, aspiring librarian and addicted reader” living in Key West, Florida. She’s also the writer behind the The Bone Island Book Blog.

Photos Of Day One Of The Canoe Project

Mar 18, 2013
Terence Cantarella

Take a look at some of the stunning photos taken by Terence Cantarella as he canoes through Miami-Dade county’s canals this week. Terence is the man behind the Canoe Project here at WLRN.

The Canoe Project is an effort to shed some light on the unrecognized backdrop to our lives here in Miami-Dade: our city’s vast network of canals. These waterways completely surround us, yet, many of us don’t know where they go or why they are there.