Ultra Music Festival

Helado Negro

He’s been called a “sound artist,” and a “sonic stylist.”  His music has been described as “genre-defying.”  It seems that fans and music critics alike are always struggling to describe exactly what Roberto Carlos Lange does for a living.

“I struggle with it,” says Lange with a smile.

The Brooklyn-based, South Florida-born artist says he’s not into labels.  “When people label something, I oppose it,” he says. “And, so then, I sabotage that label.”

But a metaphor?  That’s a different story.  Take his stage name: Helado Negro, Spanish for black ice cream.

Today on WLRN-Miami Herald News, you heard:

Source / Courtesy

During his sophomore year of high school, Topher started listening to electronic music in the vein of dubstep and drum and bass. Soon he got hooked onto the rest of the electronic musical tree.

Now he's a 21-year-old psychology student at Florida International University. He asked that we not use his full name, because during this year's Winter Music Conference, he plans on rolling. 

"Rolling" commonly refers to consuming molly, a hallucinogenic amphetamine-like drug marketed as MDMA. At least that’s what it’s supposed to be.

Amenic181 / freedigitalphotos.net

In gearing up for a potential presidential bid, former Florida Governor Jeb Bush talked education at a summit in Tallahassee.

With the intention of releasing his emails from his time as Florida's governor, Bush also released some Floridians' personal information like Social Security numbers. 

Miami-Dade legislators say Florida may finally be expanding Medicaid this year.

Miami Herald

A private security guard who was trampled by gatecrashers at Ultra Music Festival earlier this year is suing the event’s organizers for $10 million.

Hours before the March 16 stampede, Miami police said they warned concert organizers that the fencing near Southeast First Street and Biscayne Boulevard was inadequate.

Erica Mack was patrolling that area when ticketless Ultra fans pushed their way through the chain link fence, toppling it over her. The crowd then ran over Mack’s body as they disappeared into the party crowd inside Bayfront Park in downtown Miami.

Minors Banned From Miami's Ultra Music Festival

Sep 3, 2014

Organizers of Ultra Music Festival, held at Miami's Bayfront Park, announced a big change for future events: no minors allowed.

Event officials say this decision is not solely based on incidents from the last festival. Back in March, security guard Erika Mack was trampled when a crowd knocked down a chain link fence. Also, patron Pena Escoto died from an accidental overdose.

Commission Votes To Keep Ultra In Miami

Apr 24, 2014


Ultra's not going anywhere. On Thursday the Miami City Commission voted to retain the music festival.

After two hours of discussion, the commission ultimately showed their support for Ultra in a four-to-one vote. Opposition of the festival came from Commissioner Marc Sarnoff, who no longer wants Ultra to take place in downtown Miami. 


He cited weaknesses in security that have allowed those without tickets to jump the fence and acts of violence as a result of drug use at the festival. 





The sign-up is over: now the coverage.

The deadline to get health insurance under the Affordable Care Act passes with hundreds of thousands of Floridians signing up. Who’s covered? Who isn’t? And at what price?

Those are some of the questions we're asking this week on The Florida Roundup. Also on our radar: 

Amid Ultra's Electronic Beats, A String Quartet Plays

Apr 2, 2014
Bernard Hacker

While the EDM and light shows were going off Sunday at Ultra, a string quartet at the Gale Hotel in South Beach played alongside a DJ and composer.

Backed by DJ Benji B and composer Grant Windsor, The Deviation String Quartet from London re-interpreted songs by artists like Drake, Sampha and Pepe Braddock.

The concept started in 2011, when Benji was asked to DJ at the London Eye, the big wheel overlooking the Thames River in London.

Why Do Ravers Wear Their Countries' Flags To Ultra?

Mar 31, 2014
Diego Saldana-Rojas

At a festival dedicated to a genre of music that does not rely on lyrics, it's interesting that many attendees chose to represent their nationalities: Ultra Music Festival goers came in flying the flags of their home regions, from Northern Ireland and Catalonia to France and Australia.

Some wore them as capes over their backs, others as skirts and a few as bandanas over their heads and faces. Click through the slideshow above and see how many flags you can identify.

Did you go to Ultra? Why do you think people like to wear their flags?