trees

South Florida lost a lot of trees during Hurricane Irma. While Miami-Dade, Broward and Palm Beach counties avoided a direct hit, the storm managed to topple  palm and other canopy trees, littering the streets with tree trunks, branches and palm fronds.

One month later, the debris from the trees and shrubbery remains on the curb or street waiting to be picked up. 

Not long ago, two Americans caused a scene in a Mozambique village. Locals were mystified by the tourists spending several days photographing a single tree.

"Sometimes we have to explain to people what we're doing but often they just think, 'Okay these guys are nuts,'" says New York photographer Len Jenshel.

Nadege Green / WLRN

Laura Everette didn’t know what to do after Hurricane Irma knocked a tree onto her minivan.

Everette, 57, is a double amputee and she lives on a fixed income.

Tree removal and clean-up can be expensive with costs ranging from the hundreds to thousands of dollars. As homeowners and renters across South Florida continue to deal with the aftermath of Irma, that means figuring out what to do with toppled trees on private property.

Everette, a renter, tried calling her landlord but didn’t get a response.

Attractions Magazine

Springtime in South Florida means the bloom of those little yellow flowers on trees across the region. Those are tabebuia trees (pronounced tah-beh-BOO-ya). We spoke with Lee County Horticulture Agent Stephen H. Brown about the tabebuia tree and how long we can expect its colorful flowers.

 

Tell us what you can about the tabebuia tree.

 

Wikimedia Commons

Arborists climbed to the top of a 2,000-year-old bald cypress tree in Seminole County Monday.

They gathered clippings from the soaring cypress known as Lady Liberty as part of an effort to clone some of the world’s oldest trees and rebuild depleted forests.

The idea is to rebuild forest using the genetics of the world’s sturdiest trees.

Jake Millarch of the Archangle Ancient Tree Archive was one of three arborists who climbed Lady Liberty to gather clippings.

satit_srihin / freedigitalphotos.net

We've all seen the Harlem Shake videos on YouTube: the Miami Heat Harlem Shake, the underwater diving team Harlem Shake, the Florida Senate pages' Harlem Shake. It was hilarious for a while, until it wasn't anymore.

But there is one that still has me laughing - the Harlem Shake "Tree Version."