technology

Aereo

A TV antenna the size of a dime. That's it below, on the right. Long gone are the days of the RCA console television in your grandparent's (or great grandparent's) living room with two silver rods jutting out at all angles as you squint through the "snow" to catch a glimpse of Looney Tunes.

Thanks to high speed Internet connections and cloud computing, Aereo is disrupting the traditional TV and cable business like very few.

At some point in the coming weeks, users of Apple iPhones and iPads will wake up to an alert that there is a new version of the company's mobile operating system, known as iOS, for them to install.

If users follow historical patterns, within a few days of the launch of iOS 7, almost all of them will install the updated software and, just like that, more than 500 million phones and tablets will be made new. Never before has a technology industry launch come close to matching the scale and speed of this switch.

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08/26/13 - Join us for Monday’s Topical Currents.  We discuss the digital revolution in regard to parents and children. We love our screens:  be they smartphones, laptops or tablets and worlds of communication, information and games they offer. But how does this affect the new generation of children . . . and parents?

What does an app born from the spirit of Miami look like?

It looks like Sktchy, a start up mobile app motivated by Sketchy Miami, a blog and series of parties spotted around town two years ago where the goal was to create a portrait of every person in Miami.

Sketchy Miami comes from a time when “a burgeoning artist community in Miami and the average Miami resident had very little interaction with that community,” said co-founder Jordan Melnick. He wondered, “how can we come up with a way to bridge that gap?”

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Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And our last word in business is: Paycheck for day at the beach.

Yearkbook photo/ Palm Echo 1982

When Jeffrey Preston Bezos graduated from Miami Palmetto Senior High in 1982, he had big plans to change the world.

The valedictorian, National Merit Scholar and Silver Knight award winner for science told the Miami Herald he wanted to “build space hotels, amusement parks, yachts and colonies for two or three million people orbiting around the earth.”

Eventually, his grand plan included getting everybody off the blue planet and turning it into a big park of sorts.

The news spread with the speed of the Internet: The Washington Post, a newspaper that helped bring down a president, would be sold to Jeff Bezos, the tech titan who started Amazon.

Florida schools are gearing up for new education standards and accompanying online testing. Schools must also prepare to deliver half of all classroom instruction digitally by 2015.

So what will this mean for students, teachers and schools? It’s the subject of this week’s Florida Matters on WUSF radio.

They Can Hear You Now: The Global Surge In Cellphone Use

Jul 22, 2013

The age of the traditional landline telephone is in rapid decline, as NPR's Dan Bobkoff reports on today's All Things Considered.

Thirty years ago parents had to tell their kids to turn off the television and go to sleep.  Today, it’s their mobile phone.  Teenagers are more socially active than ever before, at least virtually.

A Pew Institute Research study on Teens, Social Media and Privacy found that 95 percent of teenagers use the Internet and eight in ten of them use some kind of social media, especially Facebook and Twitter.

Why Mobile Devices Might Mean Shorter Attention Spans

Jul 11, 2013

Mobile gadgets such as phones and tablet computers may be eroding kids’ attention spans and contributing to a rise in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder diagnosis, according to researchers in this Time magazine piece.

That’s because mobile devices condition their users to expect constant, electronic stimulus. When kids put down those devices, the real world can seem slow-paced and less interesting.

From the story:

Alex M. Sanchez/Miami Herald Staff

Many U.S. cities are competing to bring biotech companies and jobs to their communities, places like Phoenix, Buffalo, Gainesville and of course, Miami.

They all want to develop an industry cluster, and while cities like San Diego and Boston have already successfully grown theirs, Miami’s efforts are still somewhat nascent.

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