technology jobs

John O'Connor / StateImpact Florida

Lots of people think teaching students computer programming is a good idea. But where coding fits in schools is a difficult question.

Is it a science? A language? Career training?

Florida lawmakers proposed, but did not approve, letting students substitute coding for foreign language or physical education courses required for a high school diploma. The idea is also tucked into the education plan of Democratic gubernatorial candidate Charlie Crist.


Florida Atlantic University has started a collaborative project to bring South Florida tech entrepreneurs' businesses to life.

John O'Connor / WLRN

Gov. Rick Scott spent Monday touring high-tech South Florida companies looking to hire.

He wants to make sure firms like Boca Raton's Modernizing Medicine, which designs electronic medical record systems, have workers ready.

“I’ve got kids and even... grandkids – the jobs of the future are going to be science, technology, engineering and math-related," said Scott, a Republican. "So we need to do workforce training in those areas.”

Diego Saldana-Rojas

Hundreds of entrepreneurs and start-up enthusiasts gathered Monday for Start-Up City: Miami. The Atlantic magazine organized the conference to promote South Florida’s potential as a great place to start a tech company.

But a Silicon Valley investor whose company funded DropBox and Reddit says Miami has a long way to go. Listen to Y Combinator's incoming president Sam Altman on his impression of Miami as a start-up city.*

Julia Duba / WLRN

Ask your boss if she likes this story. With the right software she could be monitoring every key stroke and screen shot of your company-issued smart phone or computer. Every single day. Every word you say.

What The Lack Of Asian-Americans Says About Miami

Jul 11, 2013

“Miami is the face of America's future” is a refrain I’ve heard often.  It seems a point of pride that Miami is leading the rest of the country in our racial diversity.

But this statement is only true if you disregard people like me, Asian-Americans.

The U.S. population is about six percent Asian-American. Chicago has a slightly higher share, and Boston and New York have about 10 percent and 14 percent, respectively.   

 Miami-Dade County has less than two percent. That’s lower than the percentage of Asian-Americans for the entire state of Florida. 

Courtesy photo

At the recent WLRN/Miami Herald-sponsored Town Hall on Session 2013 panelist Sen. Jack Latvala mentioned the need to focus on science and technology education to better prepare Florida's kids for a tech-centric global job market. It's a point echoed by Lew Crampton who serves as president and chief executive officer for the South Florida Science Museum.