Tech

This story was reported by Latino USA in collaboration with All Tech Considered. The audio version of this story aired earlier on Latino USA; it is embedded below.

Micaela Honorato is looking from the sidelines as boys from her after-school program take turns racing their hand-made hovercraft on a dirt field in a city park.

President-elect Donald Trump met Wednesday afternoon with a who's-who of the tech industry. They came from Silicon Valley and elsewhere to Trump Tower in Manhattan, where they talked about jobs and innovation.

More and more of the things we use every day are being connected to the Internet.

The term for these Internet-enabled devices — like connected cars and home appliances — is the Internet of things. They promise to make life more convenient, but these devices are also vulnerable to hacking.

Security technologist Bruce Schneier told NPR's Audie Cornish that while hacking someone's emails or banking information can be embarrassing or costly, hacking the Internet of things could be dangerous.

Don't Look Now! How Your Devices Hurt Your Productivity

Oct 19, 2016

I'll admit it. I even take my phone with me when I head to the restroom, to fire off a few texts. Or I'll scroll through my email when I leave the office for lunch. My eyes are often glued to my phone from the moment I wake up, but I often reach the end of my days wondering what I've accomplished.

Pokemon Go trainers will do almost anything for a rare find, including getting into a car and speeding around to catch them. And then they tweet about it. According to a study, there were over 113,000 social media messages in 10 days last July that showed people getting into potentially unsafe traffic situations while trying to catch cute virtual monsters.

twitter.com/MarkDGrossman

The future is, literally, now, at least in the Back to the Future universe: Oct. 21, 2015.

The sequel of the 1985 classic has time-traveling Marty McFly ogling at all kinds of cool things that the creators imagined we'd have by now.

More data is coming from the annual Sunshine State Survey.

This time, it shows that 85 percent of Floridians want people buying a gun or getting a gun license to get mental health screenings first.

Susan MacManus, the survey director and a political scientist at the University of South Florida, says that almost all Floridians agree on this issue.

"This is probably the most solid and most consensual opinion that we've seen in virtually the entire Sunshine State Survey," she says.

John O'Connor / StateImpact Florida

Ashley Jean is graduating from Miami’s iPrep Academy this week. And then she’s planning to travel the world.

Jean will start a global studies program through Long Island University that will eventually take her to places like Costa Rica, Australia, Bali and Spain.

That’s a lot of plane tickets.

“I don’t want money to be a reason why I can’t change my life,” Jean says, “so I have to work hard to do what I can to get this program.”

Paul Oka/flickr

What if our cell phones could automatically block our ability to text behind the wheel? A Florida Atlantic University professor says he’s developed software to make that happen.

Spotify-Based Map Makes Miami Playlist

May 19, 2015
Dave Martin / AP Photo via Miami Herald

Jimmy Buffett. The Blues Brothers. LMFAO. These different artists have one thing in common: they've made songs about Miami.

And a Spotify-based program called Spotimap charted those songs on a map. Users can find songs by clicking on cities marked with little green notes.

This is what it looks like when five insiders write letters to the South Florida technology industry of the future. 

For several years now the tech industry here has been a mix of promise and proclamations. Miami has been listed among the places to become the next Silicon Valley even while many in the industry here resist that kind of hype.

Tom Hudson

Higher than New York, Chicago and Dallas. Better than Atlanta, Seattle and Houston. South Florida's entrepreneurial activity is third highest among the nation's largest metropolitan areas.  Only San Francisco and Los Angeles ranked higher in the group's annual index of entrepreneurial activity.

Why Miami?

blacktechweek.com

Techies from across the country and the world have come together this week to celebrate diversity in the tech industry.

The first ever Black Tech Week is taking place this week with events all around Miami. 

Twenty-two-year-old Delane Parnell works for a venture capital firm that funds tech startups. This makes him a hot commodity at Black Tech. Parnell was a speaker at one of the events at the conference.

NBC 6

 

There’s an interesting juxtaposition happening in South Florida during the last week of Black History Month.

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