Tia Mitchell/Herald-Times Tallahassee Bureau

Forums are being offered around the country about the Affordable Care Act.

A group calling itself the Obamacare Enrollment Team is providing information and answering questions.

But the people on the team do not work for the federal government, and they’re pushing products sold by a South Florida insurance company.

Leon Brown/FSU

Wendy Nader remembers when her mom started showing obvious signs of Alzheimer’s disease.

“I would talk to her on the phone and she would repeat what she had just told me two or three times in one conversation,” Nader said. “When she started doing that, it was a huge red flag. It wasn’t too long after that, that she started getting lost.”

Nader’s mom, in her early 70’s at the time, would drive to a Miami mall or bank where she was a regular – only to forget where she was.

Grant Cochrane/freedigitalphotos.net

A study measuring the potential economic impact of gambling casinos in Florida has been delayed a month. It was due October 1.

In a letter to legislative leaders, Spectrum Gaming Group requested a new deadline of November 1 to complete the study.

Their request came after state economists questioned the economic models used in the report.

RELATED: Florida Lawmakers Delay Highly Anticipated Gambling Study

Miami-Dade Office of Film & Entertainment

Now that “Burn Notice” has wrapped up seven successful seasons, will a new show step in to send the world a postcard of Miami every week?

The USA Network production ended its run recently while ratings were still strong. Thanks to a worldwide audience, it’s likely to live for years in syndication.

But the end of the show, as well as A&E’s The Glades and Starz’ Magic City this summer, leaves a void in Miami’s economy. A lot of folks made money off these productions selling props, renting cars, catering food, cleaning costumes and working on-camera.

Network 355/flickr

The Equal Rights Amendment (ERA) may be making a comeback.

A proposed resolution filed in Tallahassee asks lawmakers to ratify a proposed U.S. constitutional amendment stating that civil rights may not be denied based on one's sex.

For now, the move is largely symbolic.

Florida Governor's Office

Gov. Rick Scott is pulling out all the stops to lure companies to Florida.

He convinced lawmakers to cut the sales tax on manufacturing equipment and do away with regulations that could hinder economic growth.

RELATED: The Sunshine Economy: Jobs

Gina Jordan/WLRN

Thirty-seven-year-old Derrick Sneed testified before Florida lawmakers last spring for a new law that removes all references to “mental retardation” in state law. 

“The more I learn about the R-word (the more I want) to get rid of this R-word and stop this R-word right now. It’s very important to me,” Sneed said. “People say retarded – and I said respect someone.”

The term “mental retardation” is being removed from more than 400 Florida statutes and being replaced with “intellectual disability.”

Andrea Waldrop/flickr

Three children in Tampa were among 105 children rescued nationwide last month during a FBI sex trafficking sting operation.

“Operation Cross Country” focused on underage victims of prostitution and led to more than 150 arrests.

401(K) 2013/flickr

Some state contractors are worried about new public records requirements that cost them money and put them at risk of legal trouble.

Vendors acting on behalf of state agencies are now subject to a higher level of record keeping because of a bill passed by the Florida Legislature this year.

Mark Foley/myfloridahouse.gov

A bill that would have ended permanent alimony in Florida was vetoed by Gov. Rick Scott a few months ago. But plans are already being made to bring it back next year.

Members of the group Family Law Reform will hold a summit and fundraiser in Orlando on August 17, focused on reforming what they say are outdated permanent alimony laws.

Rep. Ritch Workman, R-Melbourne, told a House Committee last March it's not about getting rid of alimony – it's about being fair.