Supreme Court

The U.S. Supreme Court says Florida’s practice of deciding if someone gets the death penalty is unconstitutional. What does this mean for the almost 400 people on Florida’s death row? Will the legislature try to change the process?

The first flight of Cuban migrants stuck in Costa Rica landed in El Salvador this week … as they hope to come to the U.S. In Washington, Senator and Republican presidential candidate Marco Rubio filed legislation to change the benefits Cuban immigrants get when they make it to the U.S.

Florida Dept. of Corrections

In a decision a former state Supreme Court justice called "monumental," the U.S. Supreme Courton Tuesday struck down Florida's capital-punishment sentencing system, saying that juries --- not judges--- should be responsible for imposing the death penalty.

The 8-1 decision coincided with the opening day of the 2016 legislative session, sending Republican lawmakers scrambling to address what could have far-reaching implications on death penalty cases throughout the state.

The Supreme Court ruled Tuesday that Florida's system for sentencing people to death is unconstitutional because it gives too much power to judges — and not enough to juries — to decide capital sentences.

Creative Commons via Flickr / Pete Jordan (https://flic.kr/p/c3STn3)

This year, the U.S. Supreme Court has taken on a litany of big cases with far-reaching implications especially for Floridians. Here are some things you need to know about how several upcoming decisions will affect the Sunshine State.

The Supreme Court, in King v. Burwell, will soon decide whether more than a million Floridians will lose subsidies they rely on to buy insurance on HealthCare.gov.  

11/05/14 - Wednesday's Topical Currents reviews the history and actions of the Supreme Court of the United States, with noted constitutional attorney Erwin Chemerinsky. He notes that most people consider the Supreme 

  Court an impartial body, imparting learned decisions on key issues. He also notes, however, that Justices are human, and often show bias and political colors. Chemerinsky has written THE CASE AGAINST THE SUPREME COURT. Hear the discussion Wednesday at 1pm on Topical Currents.

What do salsa dancing and the Supreme Court have to do with each other? A lot, according to author Joan Biskupic, whose new book about Justice Sonia Sotomayor is now out in bookstores.

Creative Commons via Flickr user Jim Fischer

UPDATE 11:15 a.m. Oct. 31: In the latest development of the City of Miami's request to revisit the Pottinger case, Federal Judge Federico Moreno has officially called for an evidentiary hearing.  This means both sides will present data and witnesses who will attest to whether the landscape for the homeless in Miami has, in fact, changed. The judge has the ability to reopen the original settlement if the change is significant enough.

Photo provided

Update, June 26: This post was originally published back in April of this year but we decided to rerun it in light of today's decision by the U.S. Supreme Court.

Last summer, my father-in-law entered the hospital in Germany. My wife, Lu Mueller-Kaul, desperately wanted to be with him. But she was in this country on a complicated visa that forbids her from returning if she leaves. She stayed as her father suffered, cursing the unfair system.

Outreach For New Health Insurance Exchanges Targets Latinos

Jun 25, 2013

Andrea Velandia, 29, is just the sort of person the architects of the new health insurance marketplaces had in mind when they were thinking about future customers.

She's young, in good health, uninsured and Latino.

"We're very healthy. We don't have many issues," she says of her family. For the most part, she and her husband avoid the health system. "It's very expensive to go to the doctor to get a regular checkup," she says. "And you only have an option to go to the emergency room, which is even more expensive."

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