Sundial

Sundial guests for Thursday, May 10, 2018:

Delaney Reynolds is an 18-year-old college freshman at University of Miami's Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science and a climate activist. Delaney is the lead youth in the Reynolds v. State of Florida case, a lawsuit introduced by 18 Florida kids and teens against the state and Gov. Rick Scott over climate change.

On Tuesday, Florida House leaders proposed a higher-education budget that includes cuts prompting state universities and colleges to spend money from their reserve funds. WLRN’s education reporter, Jessica Bakeman, joined the program. She is in Tallahassee covering the legislative session.

Unlike other state agencies, colleges and universities do not need to send their leftover general revenue back to the state treasury each year. The House argues that schools keep those dollars and as a result funds have grown, explained Bakeman.

WLRN

Today on Sundial: Salvadorans were the most recent refugee group to lose Temporary Protected Status (TPS). It's now likely that Hondurans will also lose theirs. What's the latest update on groups like these and Nicaraguans and Haitians? What are people doing to stay in the U.S. or find another country that may take them in? We talk with Ana Quiros of Catholic Legal Services about TPS and about the recent raids by immigration services.

WLRN’s daily news and cultural affairs show Sundial features news, politics, music, sports, arts and food — all with a local twist. It airs at 1 p.m. Monday-Thursday.

Here's what the people behind the show are reading.

Luis Hernandez, host

Felipe Rivas

Hollywood has created its share of movies about teachers. And in most of those films, the teaching profession is seen as a noble, almost heroic, position in society. Teachers can be heroic, but it's never the same as in the movies.  

Music has long been used as a vehicle to drive social awareness forward. Artists like Bob Marley and Gil Scott-Heron tackled political issues head-on in their lyrics and used their voices to speak for the forgotten, marginalized people. Such artists are found in all corners of the world.

In Haiti, Joseph Emmanuel “Manno” Charlemagne followed this tradition fervently, writing songs about Haitian politics and the circumstances of his countrymen. Charlemagne died Sunday, Dec. 10, in a Miami Beach hospital where he was being treated for cancer.      

The South Florida sun appeals to almost everyone: tourists, snowbirds, even embattled prime ministers looking to unwind after saving a nation from the threat of a Nazi invasion. After the end of World War II, British Prime Minister Winston Churchill and his Conservative Party lost the elections of 1945, forcing Churchill to resign as prime minister.

Uncertainty looms at the Florida Supreme Court as three judges near retirement at the same time Gov. Rick Scott leaves office in January 2019. Who will pick the three vacant spots on the court: Gov. Scott or his successor? The decision may change the balance between conservative and liberal members of the court.  

Croquetas, churrasco, Cuban-sandwiches, café con leche and tostada— these are very recognizable parts of Miami’s gastronomy. Locals and tourists alike revel at the sight, smell and taste of such cuisine. Now, you can add donuts to that coveted list and they look like something out of Homer Simpson's wildest donut-dreams. 

Thusday on Sundial:  Nursing homes in Florida have been in the national spotlight due to the tragedy at the Rehabilitation Center at Hollywood Hills, where 12 patients died as result of a power outage caused by Hurricane Irma.  

The next Florida legislative session is quickly approaching and on file are numerous bills that address many issues regarding nursing homes. The Sun Sentinel’s Dan Sweeney, who covers the  Legislature and statewide political issues, joins the program to talk about the future of standards and practices in assisted-living facilities in the state.

Today on Sundial: Haitians living in the U.S.  have until July 2019 to return to Haiti or leave the country. The decisions come after the Department of Homeland Security ended  Temporary Protected Status for Haitians Immigrants earlier this month. Marleine Bastien, executive director of Haitian Women of Miami (FANM), an advocacy group dedicated to serving the needs of low-income women and their families, joins us to understand more about the Haitian TPS termination.

Today on Sundial: Political parties in Florida are in turmoil. Over the past months, many sexual scandals and harassment settlements have come to light in Tallahassee. Matt Dixon, bureau chief of Politico Florida, joins the conversation on the sleazy side of Florida’s politicians.

Today on Sundial: Miami Beach’s new mayor, Dan Gelber, joins us in the studio to talk about the future challenges the city faces.

Miami Beach residents can expect a low-key  style from Gelber, who understands the intricacies of policymaking and knows the influence the mayor can have in the city. Gelber has a very different style than his predecessor, Phillip Levine, who has officially launched his run for governor.

New York Times press release

The Miami Herald’s top political reporter will soon have a bigger platform.

Patricia Mazzei — who has worked at the Herald for a decade, most recently as its lead political writer — starts early next month as the Miami bureau chief for the New York Times. She’ll be based here in South Florida, after first working for a few months in New York City.

“We’re going to tell the story of Florida for people not just elsewhere in the country but elsewhere in the world,” she told Luis Hernandez, host of Sundial, WLRN’s new daily news show.

Today on Sundial: Miami's new mayor, Francis Suarez, joined us in the studio.

Suarez, who was elected in November, made transportation a key issue in his campaign. He said he hopes to use his experience as vice chair of a county-wide transportation planning board to find solutions for traffic congestion and increase access to public transit.

He aims to make Miami one of the most resilient cities in the country, amid the threat of rising seas.

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