sports

ANDREW ULOZA / FOR THE MIAMI HERALD

For six years, Little Haiti residents have been waiting for Emmanuel “Manno” Sanon Soccer Park, known as Little Haiti Soccer Park, to live up to its promise for neighborhood kids.

Many believed the $36.9 million park, built in 2008 and named after a renowned Haitian soccer player, would host a year-round youth soccer program. A newly formed youth soccer league is looking to fill that void.

The only consistent youth sports program at soccer park is a pee-wee American football team, Little Haiti Optimist.

Jimmy Baikovicius / Flickr

From Chile to China, soccer fans like to think their teams reflect their national characters.

That’s a delusion, of course. These are jocks, not exchange students. But if international fútbol really is the continuation of war by other means, you at least want to believe your soccer soldiers share your values.

Which is why Uruguay – a nation whose progressive values are so often applauded these days – should follow this advice: Lose Luis.

Al Diaz / Miami Herald Staff

The University of Miami Hurricanes have had trouble filling Sun Life Stadium in the past. It is far away from campus, and attendance often does not fill even the lower bowl. So the marketing team at the athletics department tried something a little unconventional: They created an ad calling on fans to "GO TO FEWER GAMES."

Julia Duba / WLRN

Do Brazilians still care about soccer?

I know, that seems as dumb a question as "Does the Vatican still care about Jesus?" Brazilians are arguably the most soccer-passionate people on Earth.

But check out this poll result just before the World Cup started last week in Brazil: A majority of Brazilians said they were not happy about hosting international soccer’s biggest event.

That’s because Brazil’s World Cup preparations were such an embarrassment. And because the Cup’s billion-dollar cost overruns are such a source of anger for Brazilians right now.

Miami Herald

David Beckham's stadium is yet to find a home in South Florida -- and Major League Soccer officials are kicking aside locations that aren't in downtown Miami.

MLS recently rejected the proposal to build Beckham's stadium next to Marlins Park, the former Orange Bowl site. MLS president Mark Abbott says the stadium needs to be downtown to be successful, the Miami Herald reports. But six years ago, MLS seriously considered the former Orange Bowl location.

Matt McGee / Flickr

The Miami Dolphins can earn millions in tourism tax dollars each year for luring high-profile sports and entertainment events to Sun Life Stadium, according to a deal approved by the Miami-Dade County Commission Tuesday.

As part of the deal, Dolphins owner Stephen Ross has agreed to spend $350 million to upgrade the Miami Gardens stadium.

The commission voted 7-4 in favor of the deal.

The Dolphins would get a share of the 3 percent tax charged for local hotel stays.

For South Floridian Soccer Fans, The World Cup Is About Unity

Jun 16, 2014
Constanza Gallardo / WLRN

 

For Silvina Di Pietro cheering for her national team is one of the best ways to support her country.  

Di Pietro was born in Argentina but moved to South Florida 14 years ago. She still supports her birth country's team, especially during the World Cup.

“Argentina is one of the most beloved, devoted people that love soccer,” she says. “For us it's like a religion."

She says soccer is the world’s No. 1 sport, and the best thing about it is it brings people together.  

When The Heat Fall... On Photographers

Jun 13, 2014

The Miami Heat fell to the San Antonio Spurs in this 2014 NBA Finals, after winning only one game in the seven-game series. Despite the definitive loss, one group may be relieved: the courtside photographers who won't have to feel the weight of falling players for a while.

If you've seen a handful of games, you may have witnessed a basketball player trip, jump or slide off court and onto a nearby photographer (or sometimes fan). Below, read about what it's like to be on the ground when that happens.

C.M. GUERRERO / EL NUEVO HERALD

 

The search continues for a soccer stadium in Miami. The City of Miami tells David Beckham he cannot build on a bay front boat slip.  

But the beautiful game kicks off its quadrennial contest.  Has Brazil’s confidence on and off the field jeopardized success of the World Cup? And the Heat’s season is in jeopardy after losing two in a row to the Spurs.

International Tweeters Use Hashtag To Protest The World Cup

Jun 12, 2014
Openclipart.org

Tweeters, mainly in Spain and Latin America, are using the hashtag #NoVoyABrasilPorque to state why they're not going to -- and some boycotting -- Brazil for the World Cup. The users are mainly protesting Brazil’s economic preference toward the tournament than many of its social issues.

Kenny Malone / WLRN

    

The Miami Heat are one of just four teams to play in four consecutive NBA Finals. For Heat season ticket holders, that’s like winning the lottery four times in a row. 

But many fans cannot or choose not to shell out the cash it would take to buy season tickets on their own. Like a timeshare, they join informal season ticket pools with colleagues, friends and friends of friends.

Come playoff time, fairly divvying up those tickets can prove challenging.

Al Diaz / Miami Herald

By milking the corner three-point shot, the Miami Heat have backed the Indiana Pacers into a corner.

Following Monday night’s 90 to 102 loss, the Pacers find themselves in some troubling company: More than 200 teams have gone down 3-1 in an NBA best-of-seven series, only eight of them have ever come back to win the series.

www.samuelfreedman.com

03/19/14- Wednesday's Topical Currents: The City of Miami’s Orange Bowl stadium is gone.  The high-tech Marlins stadium is now at the sight.  But it was the venue of many, many impactful games.  Think of the many Orange Bowl classics . . . Or Joe Namath and the Jets winning the Super Bowl . . . The underdog Hurricanes outlasting Nebraska by a point in 1984 . . . Or Dan Marino & Don Shula besting the undefeated Chicago Bears in 1985. But more than 40 years ago, another landmark game was played.

HistoryMiami

Before basketball, the sport to behold in Miami was boxing. That love of sport captured the imagination well beyond the sunny sands and palm trees. Fifty years ago this week, Charles "Sonny" Liston fought Cassius Clay for the World Heavyweight Championship at the South Beach Convention Center.

The beloved 22-year-old boxer from the 5th St. Gym stepped into this fight as Cassius Clay and people say he emerged as Muhammad Ali.

Go back in time, put on your best outfit and take your place beside the ring:

Christine DiMattei

Every Wednesday night, 35-year-old Amy Tejirian takes the long drive from her home in South Beach to the Saveology Iceplex in Coral Springs.

Once there, she dons some strange gear for someone who lives year-round  in Miami. But the heavy jacket, wool hat and gloves are a must at the rink. Outside, it's a seasonable 70 degrees. Inside, it's so cold, you can see your own breath.

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