sports

Downtown Miami Welcomes Formula E Race

Mar 15, 2015
Lisann Ramos / WLRN

This weekend downtown Miami hosted the first Formula E car race in the United States.  

The Formula E is similar to Formula 1 races -- except the cars are electric.

It was quite the adjustment for those accustomed to racing in gas-powered vehicles. Daniel Abt is a driver who raced in Saturday’s event.

“It did happen to me that I thought the engine wasn’t running and it actually was. When you’re not accelerating, there’s no sound at all,” said Abt.

Ken Stanek / Florida Keys News Service

Since 1987, Key West has hosted the international sail racing world each January. Quantum Race Week fills thousands of hotel rooms and provides footage that is shown all over the globe.

But the regatta's future is in question with the announcement Monday from Premiere Racing, the event's owner and organizer, that it is stepping aside.

Walt Michot / Miami Herald

Diana Nyad’s most famous journey, her swim across the Florida Straits, started in Havana and ended in Key West. Her newest project – a one-woman stage show – is starting out on the island. 

The distance swimmer made international headlines when she came ashore in Key West on Labor Day 2013. It was her fifth attempt at the crossing. She was 64 years old.

Andrew T. Sullivan / Flickr Creative Commons

Local leaders in West Palm Beach are looking forward to hundreds of jobs and a fatter economy from a proposed $135 million spring training baseball stadium that's nearing approval on a couple of fronts.

But, they say, they'll give it up in a minute if scientists find it’s a threat to their drinking water.

Luis Hernandez / WLRN

There used to be a time when athletes would get knocked in the head, fall to the ground, struggle to get back on their feet and wobble around before regaining their bearings.

It used to be called "getting a ding." Athletes were encouraged to just "walk it off."

That still happens in many sports, from the youth levels all the way to the pros. But over the past few years, recreational leagues, schools and athletic associations have gotten more serious about these head injuries.

Junette Reyes / WLRN

Almost a year has passed since retired soccer star David Beckham announced he would make Miami the home of his new team. So far, there are only rumblings concerning the franchise’s status.

In hopes of eventually settling Beckham's Major League Soccer franchise in Miami, the Miami-Dade County commission voted Tuesday on a resolution that would allow the team to negotiate with Florida International University. The school's football stadium would serve as a temporary home for the franchise.

Hector Gabino / El Nuevo Herald Staff

It was almost a year ago when international soccer star David Beckham stood before a crowd of Miami leaders and fans to announce he chose Miami as the home to his new expansion franchise for Major League Soccer.

Beckham retired in 2013, but part of his contract with the MLS was a $25 million option to start a franchise. On the day of the announcement there was a lot of excitement. A year later, that excitement has become somewhat deflated. (Super Bowl pun intended.)

Jae C. Hong / AP Photo

Cuban baseball players live a great life compared to other Cuban residents. They make approximately $40 to $200 a month with a few extra bonus incentives, a much better salary than the average Cuban's. They also get better housing, an annual bonus and the coveted privilege of traveling.

Dolphins fans will notice changes to the stadium next season. Construction crews have begun renovations by removing hundreds of seats. It's part of a $350 million facelift to the 27-year-old stadium. 

Last week the team opened up the stadium for a group of county officials and the media. Owner Stephen Ross announced his commitment to give the stadium a reset. The changes would improve the experience for fans. But the biggest reason for the facelift is about getting back on the list of sites to host the Super Bowl. 

Mike Fernandez / Courtesy

  

By the looks of this photograph, one would think Mike Fernandez and Earvin "Magic" Johnson have known each other for years. When they greeted each other before their interview on the Sunshine Economy, they embraced in a bear hug, the 6-foot-9-inch former NBA point guard more than a head taller than the billionaire health care entrepreneur. Fernandez even gave Johnson a kiss on the cheek. This was not a boardroom greeting, but the two have known each other only since 2012.

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