South Florida

Journalism
6:00 am
Fri April 19, 2013

Pursuing Reckless Cops Wins Sun-Sentinel Its First Pulitzer

Sun-Sentinel Investigative Reporter Sally Kestin
Credit Christine DiMattei

It was a humdinger of a story.

A Miami police officer in a marked squad car is pursued, pulled over and handcuffed by a Florida state trooper after speeding down the turnpike like race car driver Dale Earnhardt, Jr.

A dash-cam video of that pre-dawn October chase in 2011 went viral and sparked a three-month investigation by the South Florida Sun-Sentinel newspaper into how local police officers routinely endangered the general public through reckless driving.

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Flawed But Fabulous
4:37 pm
Fri April 12, 2013

WLRN Live Chat Tuesday at 11 AM: Tell Us Why Miami Is 'Flawed But Fabulous'

WLRN's recent letter to the NYT sparked an online avalanche of reactions. Join our live chat on Tuesday, April 16, at 11 a.m. when Nathaniel Sadler will hear why you think Miami is 'flawed but fabulous.'
Credit Cristian P Cardenas Flickr

Well everybody, I have a new assignment. I'm WLRN's Flawed-But-Fabulous beat reporter.

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South Florida Journalism
1:26 pm
Sat March 16, 2013

What These Eyes Have Seen: Reporter Reflects On Four Decades at Miami Herald

Former Miami Herald reporter John Dorschner recently retired after nearly 43 years at the paper.
Credit Twitter @MiamiHealthcare

After nearly 43 years, John Dorschner has left The Miami Herald, and he will be sorely missed around here.

John's wry manner, and his considerable chops, both in reporting and in voice, have made him the perfect newspaper-to-radio journalist since we began the WLRN-Miami Herald News cooperation a decade ago.

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Cuban Missile Crisis
8:06 pm
Wed October 24, 2012

How The Cuban Missile Crisis Shaped Miami

Miss Miami 1963.
Charles D. Carter

How the Cuban Missile Crisis shaped Miami.

Where were you on October 22, 1962?

If you aren’t old enough to remember, ask someone over 50. That day, when President Kennedy revealed in a national TV broadcast that there were missiles in Cuba, was life altering for many, especially in South Florida.

It was a day that inspired Miami native Charles Carter, who was 16, to skip school and go to the Army Recruiting Office. With his parents' consent, he successfully enlisted in the military and was assigned to one of the four, hastily built missile sites in the Everglades - a mere 90 miles from a potential nuclear threat.

Producer Rich Halten spoke to Carter and several other people who lived through that time, tapping their memories about the Cuban Missile Crisis,  as this week marks the 50-year anniversary. 

Archival audio is from the Lynn and Louis Wolfson II Florida Moving Image Archives.

We were also fortunate to gather tales and memories from members of the Public Insight Network to enhance the already incredible story Halten produced. You can listen to the radio story above, and you can read what contributors remembered and thought of those two horrifying and sleepless weeks below.

Two Sleepless Weeks 

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