South Florida

Spencer Parts / WLRN.org

Puerto Rico’s economic crisis has gotten deeper this summer. This month the U.S. commonwealth defaulted on $1 billion of debt – and the U.S. Congress approved a federal oversight board to rescue the island.

Puerto Ricans living on the U.S. mainland want a say in how that happens. So they recently created a more unified front called the National Puerto Rican Agenda (NPRA). The group includes a South Florida chapter – which reflects the surprising growth of Florida’s Puerto Rican population down here, not just in Central Florida.

Doctor Gets 3-Plus Years In Prison For Medicare Fraud

Jul 7, 2016

A South Florida doctor will spend more than three years in federal prison after pleading guilty to falsely diagnosing hundreds of patients in a Medicare fraud scheme.

 

Court records show 57-year-old Isaac Thompson of Delray Beach also was ordered Wednesday by a federal judge to pay more than $2.1 million in restitution to the government. Thompson previously pleaded guilty to health care fraud.

You Too, Can Own A Drug Lord's Ferrari

Jul 6, 2016
Eddy Clio Via Flikr / WLRN

Ever wonder what happens to the cars of drug lords when they go off to prison? They get sold off and the government keeps the money.

 

Now the cars are being auctioned by the federal government at Marlins Park.

 

Six of the 10 cars for auction once belonged to drug kingpin Alvaro Lopez Tardon, imprisoned for 150 years in Miami in 2014 for among other things, laundering $14 million in local real estate.

Read more here: http://www.miamiherald.com/news/local/crime/article87984117.html#storylink=cpy

Courtsey Pro Footvolley Tour

This story first aired on December 14, 2015.   

These days, if you’re sitting on a South Florida beach and someone shouts, “Shark attack!” it’s probably got nothing to do with “Jaws.” Instead, it’s all about feet.

Namely, a sport called footvolley.

Public domain

Nonprofit transportation research group TRIP released a study last week that names Florida’s interstate highways the 9th most congested in the country.

 

The study shows that travel is increasing too fast for states to keep up, but Greg Stuart, executive director of the Metropolitan Planning Organization in Broward County, says the study bodes well for Florida’s future.

 

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Caitie Switalski / WLRN

South Floridians are no strangers to mango season - the time of year when round colorful fruit falls from trees in backyards across the region. One local business is taking advantage, and using the fruit almost as currency.

 

 

The Whip N’ Dip ice cream shop, 1407 Sunset Dr., Coral Gables,  has a sign in the window that reads: “It’s mango time.” It further invites people to bring in mangoes in exchange for a quart of ice cream.  

The body of Omar Mateen, the gunman who killed 49 people in the Orlando shooting on June 12th, has a final resting place: the Muslim Cemetery of South Florida in Hialeah Gardens.

It is not clear, though,  if he has already been buried or is scheduled to be buried there.

Alex Harris is covering the story for The Miami Herald. She says, after a traditional Muslim death, family members wear white and it is a relatively short grieving period.

 

“And after three days, mourning’s over, and you can change out of your white clothes and...life goes on.”

Scenes of Grief and Healing in South Florida After Orlando Attack

Jun 13, 2016
Spencer Parts

In the hours and days following the Sunday massacre at a gay club in Orlando, members of South Florida's LGBT community have gathered to mourn and to provide comfort to each other.

What is it

About this place

With

Sound and stories…

So salty.

That’s our ZipOde, a poetic ode to our zip code here at the studios in Miami: 33132.

Your zip determines the number of words in each line of the poem. So, for us, that’s three words, then three words, one word, three and two.

With our partner O, Miami poetry festival, we asked you to memorialize your own federally appointed numerical designation by writing ZipOdes.

More than 1,100 poems came in and they were a lot of fun to read.

It's not just the Gators that will kill you in Florida…. Turns out the plants will too.

This summer the 2017 Guiness Book of World Records will come out. And, for the sixth year in a row, it looks like a native tree of Florida will take the title of the world's most dangerous tree. 

Spanish conquistadors dubbed the fruit of Florida’s Manchineel tree the Manzanita de la Muerte or ‘the little apple of death.’ One bite can cause abdominal pain, vomiting, bleeding, digestive tract damage or possibly kill you.

R
Carlos Garcia Rawlins/Reuters

When Luis got home last month after four months in the US, he had to unpack his bags by candlelight. 

He had taken the trip to hone his English, and to look for work that would grant him a visa allowing him to live in the US. It took him months to save for the trip. 

But ultimately, the only job offer he received would’ve required him to live and work illegally in Washington, DC.

Pablo Martinez Monsivais / AP via Miami Herald

The world is buzzing over the viral video of President Obama dancing tango Wednesday night at a state dinner during his visit to Argentina. And no one is watching it more than tango instructors, especially here in South Florida. Today they seemed to give el presidente thumbs up.

Florida Roundup: Managing Rising Seas In South Florida

Oct 16, 2015
Climate Central

A new interactive map shows coastal cities like Miami could potentially be submerged within this century if carbon emissions worldwide continue “business as usual,” says Ben Strauss.

Strauss is vice president of sea level and climate impact at the research nonprofit Climate Central, which published the map.

It illustrates the effect of carbon emissions on sea-level rise through the year 2100.

In South Florida’s case, “the projections are difficult and unfortunate,” says Strauss.

Carlos Barria

South Florida is seeing little rain during its rainy season this year.

Eastern Miami-Dade and Broward counties are drying up and are now considered to be in extreme drought conditions, according to water managers.

So far this year, Miami-Dade was 7 inches below average rainfall and Broward was down more than 8 inches.

Mimi Whitefield / Miami Herald

As the U.S. and Cuba re-establish diplomatic relations today – and open embassies in their respective capitals – all eyes are on Washington D.C. and Havana.

Except perhaps in South Florida. Here, all Cuban politics is local. So we care less about the hot air rising today in the Beltway (where U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry and Cuban Foreign Minister Bruno Rodríguez will meet) and in La Habana later this summer (when Kerry plans to visit and inaugurate a U.S. embassy there) and more about what this means for Miami-Dade, the Keys, Broward and Palm Beach.

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