solar energy

Wilson Sayre / WLRN

Solar energy is yet again a hot issue in the Sunshine State. Voters overwhelmingly approved a constitutional amendment in August giving tax relief to businesses that own or lease solar panels. Another solar amendment will be on Florida’s ballot in November.

Wilson Sayre / WLRN

Florida’s solar Amendment 4 passed with brilliant colors Tuesday. With only 60 percent needed to pass, the measure’s overwhelming support suggests, perhaps, a new direction for solar in the Sunshine State, a relatively untapped source of energy.


Wilson Sayre / WLRN

At noon on a cloudless day, the sun beats down on the rooftop of a Coconut Grove hotel. Daren Goldin, a solar contractor, walks around rows of solar panels installed at angles on the white roof. The sun’s reflection is almost blinding, like snow on a sunny day.

Solar Initiative Tops Petition Threshold

Jan 25, 2016

A group backing a solar-energy ballot initiative has submitted enough valid petition signatures to take the issue to voters in November --- but still needs approval from the Florida Supreme Court for the proposed ballot wording.

Solar Advocates Eye 2018 For Ballot Initiative

Dec 21, 2015

Solar advocates say they are not giving up their campaign for a state constitutional amendment making the energy more available but now are looking beyond 2016 to 2018.

Mike Ray/flickr

The Florida Supreme Court on Thursday approved a proposed ballot initiative that seeks to expand the use of solar energy, moving the state one step closer to a fierce political battle next year.

Solar Energy Tampa Florida/flickr

Florida Supreme Court Justice Barbara Pariente, more than once Tuesday, advised lawyers that arguments about a proposed constitutional amendment to expand the use of solar energy leaned toward campaign rhetoric rather than key legal issues.

Still, when justices finished hearing arguments about ballot language proposed by the group Floridians for Solar Choice, supporters and opponents of the controversial initiative emerged from the Supreme Court offering positive spins.

SolarCity / AP

Backers of a proposed constitutional amendment to expand the use of solar energy say it might be four years before they would again seek voter approval if the current ballot language is rejected by the Florida Supreme Court.

Miami Herald Staff

The state of Florida is known for its great weather -- the state’s official nickname, after all, is the “Sunshine State.” But try selling solar energy in Florida and you’re likely to get a chilly reception, says a Miami-based founder of a solar startup.

Ludovic Roche, co-founder of PWRstation, claims that when it came to keeping his company’s headquarters in Miami, he and business partner, Robert Albertella, were encouraged to take the better offer and leave the U.S.

Solar Energy Tampa Florida/flickr

A citizen-led effort seeks to put a solar power-expanding initiative on Florida’s 2016 ballot. It would allow entities other than utility companies to sell the solar power they generate. At the same time, legislation proposed in Tallahassee would keep Florida as one of only five states that prevent anyone other than utilities from selling solar power.

Today on WLRN-Miami Herald News, you heard...

Mike Ray/flickr

A petition drive now underway in Florida would get a solar power amendment on the ballot in 2016. If voters approve the proposal, individuals who use the sun to generate electricity would be able to sell that electricity.

For now, only Florida’s utility companies can do that.

Supporters must collect 683,149 signatures to get the proposal before voters. At least 60 percent of voters must approve the amendment for it to be placed in the Constitution.

Today on WLRN-Miami Herald News, you heard: / Florida Solar Energy Center

A coalition of energy partners has published a census of renewable energy jobs in Florida.

The coalition includes: the Florida Alliance for Renewable Energy, the Florida Chapter of Energy Services Coalition and Environmental Entrepreneurs or E2, an affiliate of the Natural Resources Defense Council.

Why Doesn't The Sunshine State Use More Solar Energy?

Jul 22, 2014
Julia Duba

As far as solar energy goes, the Sunshine State is third in the country for potential -- and 18th in actual installation.

In Florida, there’s no financial assistance for installing solar panels on your roof. Solar energy users can only take a federal tax credit.

Florida Power and Light powers the state using mostly natural gas. Out of all the energy FPL provides, only 0.06 percent comes from solar energy.