social services

Gregg Avedon / Flickr

The Miami metro area has a higher percentage of households relying on food stamps than nearly every other major metropolitan area in the country, according to new data from the U.S. Census.

In 2012 and 2013, 17.5 percent of households in the Miami metro received food stamps, or Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits. Only the Detroit metro area ranked higher with 18.5 percent.

Flogert Dollani / Flickr CC

Wednesday is Give Miami Day. It was established last year by the Miami Foundation to encourage donations to local non-profits. Their idea is to establish a culture of giving in Miami. But what counts as charitable giving?

As you consider whether or how you will participate in Give Miami Day, try your hand at this quiz to see if you can pick out what's philanthropy and what isn't.

ANSWER CHOICES: 
A. Philanthropy
B. Charity
C. Neither
D. Both philanthropy and charity

Gloria Lewis

Florida is among the top 10 states with the largest share of its population relying on food stamps. Nearly 20 percent of the state requires assistance. However, with federal cuts to the program likely, many could find it even more difficult in South Florida, where the cost of food is above the national average.

Just over a year ago, Miranda Childe was an assistant professor in English at Miami-Dade College. But due in part to funding cuts at state colleges, she suddenly found herself out of work.

At DCF, An Untold Epidemic Of Abuse, Neglect And Death

Aug 19, 2013
Marsha Halper / Miami Herald file

On the day before she died, Jewel Re’nee Howard sat on the porch, in her grandmother’s lap, having her hair twisted into ponytails made pretty with pink and purple beads. She played outside the home with neighborhood children, ate noodles, talked and giggled, as she had so many days before, about her dream of becoming a princess.

Less than 15 hours later, Jewel was dead — her liver torn and mangled, ribs crushed, her tiny body bruised and bleeding internally.

Phillip Pessar/Flickr

Miami-Dade County Mayor Carlos Gimenez is reaching  out to religious groups to forge a social safety net that would be bigger and better than public or private sectors could achieve on their own.

Plans for the Engage305 project were announced Wednesday at a conference at Miami Dade College.

The main infrastructure of Engage305, according to Gimenez aide Lisa Martinez, will be a soon-to-launch county website where religious groups can create an on-line, faith-based network to deal cooperatively with social issues.