small business

This is the most contentious campaign season in memory, yet business goes on. Boat repairs, restaurants, banking -- you name it. Commerce continues despite the uncertainty of the election.

The economy consistently ranks as the biggest issue for most Americans. Taxes, regulations, health care, immigration even the combative tone of this election -- does the uncertainty of this election threaten to hurt or help business?

Tim Padgett / WLRN.org

Last month we thought Cuba’s communist hardliners had put the brakes on growing the island’s private sector. But you never know with Cuba.

Today Havana issued a hopeful reform that Cuba’s half a million fledgling entrepreneurs – or cuentapropistas – have long waited for. The island’s communist government announced that small private businesses may now become genuine legal entities.

Law enforcement officers in Florida can take money or property from a person if they believe it’s related to criminal activity. This includes cash or vehicles acquired during drug deals. It’s called civil-asset forfeiture. But advocates say some officers take advantage of this state law. One Republican state lawmaker wants to change it.

Nzingah Designs

The holiday shopping season is just getting started and among the flurry is a special focus on small businesses.

Tomorrow (Nov. 28) is Small Business Saturday— it’s a day that encourages consumers to shop small and local businesses. American Express started the day in 2010 to coincide with the shopping boom that immediately follows Thanksgiving. Last year, customers spent $14.3 billion at independent stores on Small Business Saturday, according to American Express.

Nadege Green

Hair Are Us, a popular hair extension business in midtown Miami, has drawn the attention of Toys R Us, one of the world’s largest retail toy chains.

The parent company of Toys R Us, Geoffrey LLC,  filed an  opposition to Hair Are Us' trademark application. In the opposition,  the company alleges Hair Are Us infringes on its established trademarks.

Kenny Malone / WLRN

In the middle of the night, Brenda Shapiro woke up and thought: “LibbyLicious.” The prefect name for a small baking business built from a mandelbread recipe handed down by her husband’s grandmother, Grandma Libby.

Unfortunately, the South Florida baker did not wake up with a social media strategy.

“This is why I have my daughter-in-law do this for me,” Shapiro says. “I’m busy baking, delivering, packaging, going out and selling my cookies myself. I’m a one-person show.”

Head To Your Local Brewery For... A Yoga Class?

Apr 14, 2014
Maria Murriel / WLRN

Click through the photos above.

This story originally ran on April 14, 2014.

Shelah Davis is a professional yoga teacher who spends her 9-to-5 at a fitness studio in Florida City. But since the fall of 2013, she's been hauling her mats to microbreweries from Homestead to Oakland Park.

She founded Om Brew Yoga -- so far the only yoga classes offered at South Florida breweries -- after learning of the practice in an established craft-beer state.

Deborah Acosta / WLRN / The Miami Herald

It's been a busy week in Washington, D.C.

As lawmakers react to the Boston Marathon bombings, parts of the Capitol had to be evacuated after suspicious letters addressed to U.S. Senator Roger Wicker and President Barack Obama were intercepted at mail screening facilities.

While dealing with that scare, members of Congress are getting their first look at a proposal for immigration reform put forth by the so-called "Gang of Eight" Senators including Florida's freshman Republican Marco Rubio.

Tax Credits/Flickr

04/11/13 - Thursday's Topical Currents begins with income tax tips from experts.  The deadline for 2012 tax filing is Monday.  We’ll also look ahead to important changes in the tax code for 2013, especially those which affect small businesses.  And more.  Linda Gassenheimer’s Food & Dining . . . with wine columnist Fred Tasker and “Dinner in Minutes.”  That’s Topical Currents, Thursday at one o’clock on WLRN.

Voters in Washington and Colorado just approved measures legalizing marijuana for recreational use. But businesses that want to sell marijuana in those states will face a problem: No bank wants to do business with them.

I called several banks in Washington. I called a local credit union, a tiny bank in the San Juan islands. Everybody said basically the same thing. Even if selling marijuana is legal under state law, it's still illegal under federal law. And banks and credit unions worry that this could get them in trouble.