slavery

Atlas Obscura

Zora Neale Hurston, one of the best known writers of the Harlem Renaissance — and the author of Their Eyes Were Watching God — has a new book. Well, that's not quite right; it's actually an old book that is only now being published. It's called Barracoon, and it's based on a series of conversations Hurston had with Cudjo Lewis, who was brought to this country aboard the last ship that carried slaves across the Atlantic. 

Do Florida politicians really want to create a "sanctuary state," as the speaker of the state House claims? And did slaves really help build the "old" state Capitol in Tallahassee? PolitiFact Florida answers these claims by politicians.

"In the ways that we teach and learn about the history of American slavery," write the authors of a new report from the Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC), "the nation needs an intervention."

WLRN

Author Ta Nehisi Coates didn't hold back on his stinging criticisms of President Donald Trump during a recent visit to Miami. Coates, a writer for the Atlantic, has written extensively on race in America. The event was put on by Miami's Book Fair and Books & Books. It was held at the Miami Dade College Wolfson Campus on Thursday, Jan. 11. 

We'll go back to that event and listen to a large portion of the conversation between Coates and WLRN's Nadege Green, who was the moderator of the event.

More than fifty years after her death, a new work by Zora Neale Hurston will hit the presses. Barracoon is her account of the last known survivor of America’s Transatlantic slave trade. The Florida anthropologist and author is known for her celebration of black life and culture in the rural South. This latest manuscript will reinforce that legacy.

Nancy Klingener / WLRN

Monroe County announced this week plans to reconfigure a dog park in Key West believed to be above the graves of Africans who were rescued from the slave trade in 1860.

The dog playground is across the street from an area already recognized as a burial yard.

While slavery was still legal in the U.S. in 1860, importing them was outlawed in 1807.

“But people kept doing it, especially Americans,” said Corey Malcom, director of archaeology for the Mel Fisher Maritime Museum in Key West.

Rohulamin Quander's ancestors were slaves.

However, unlike a majority of the enslaved population, Sucky Bay and Nancy Carter Quander served George and Martha Washington, the first First Family, and worked on their Mount Vernon farms.

Now, hundreds of years after they worked as spinners on the estate's River Farm, Sucky Bay, Carter Quander and the rest of the 317 slaves who inhabited Mount Vernon are receiving the recognition they deserve.

Miami Herald Staff

Signs about human trafficking are going up in places like airports and strips clubs in the new year. The public awareness campaign is now required by Florida law.

Human trafficking is considered to be a form of modern-day slavery. The signs encourage victims who are being exploited for sex or labor to contact a national hotline.

The new law requires the signs to be posted in a wide range of places including highway rest stops, rail stations, and emergency rooms.

The information must be displayed in English and Spanish - and meet size requirements.

Nadege Green / WLRN

For years, Marie Alina Cajuste did not know her real name. The family she worked for in Haiti called her Ti Bebe, or Little Baby.

She shared her experience as a restavec at a day-long conference about human trafficking at Broward College Thursday.

“It’s slavery,” she said. “I couldn't sleep in the same house with the family, I was the first person to wake up and buckets of clothes waiting for me to wash by hand.”

Chernush / Free the Slaves

I bought Francisco Lima his first taste of freedom in decades.

A cheeseburger.

It was 2004, and Brazil was starting to confront one of its most distressing problems: slavery. I was in northern Pará state, in the Amazon, observing a special police unit that raided slave-holding farms and firms and liberated workers like the 74-year-old Lima.