In most big cities, altering a street sign is not much cause for fanfare.  But Fort Lauderdale’s decision to re-brand one particular street is being hailed by many in the city’s African-American community.

City commissioners decided Tuesday night that the name “Sistrunk Boulevard” will no longer stop near the railroad tracks, a segregation-era dividing line between the city’s black and white communities.  Sistrunk will now appear along with Northeast Sixth Street on signs running through Flagler Village, a section quickly gentrifying into a predominantly white neighborhood.

Broward County African-American Research Library and Cultural Center

Last month, we brought you the story of a Fort Lauderdale community divided over a street name honoring one of the city's African-American heroes.  Since then, one of the neighborhoods in question has done a complete about-face that could end years of emotional debate. 

But at least one city official has questions about what sparked the turn-around.

African-American Research Library and Cultural Center

In every major city, there's at least one street sign that tells black folks they're in the right place, but tells white folks that they probably took a wrong turn.

For decades in Fort Lauderdale, one of those signs has read Sistrunk Boulevard.

The boulevard, which runs through the city’s historically black business district, is currently at the center of a contentious debate between two communities.

And the dispute is raising questions about what it takes for a neighborhood with a troubled past to rehabilitate its image.