Shakespeare

Maria Murriel

Before Sir Patrick Stewart quit high school at 15 years old, an English teacher handed him a copy of "The Merchant of Venice" by William Shakespeare and told Stewart to read the part of Shylock. That one act changed everything for the working-class teenager from Yorkshire, England. Hear him talk about reading Shakespeare for the first time.

Maria Murriel / WLRN

The actor Sir Patrick Stewart is best known in the United States for his roles on stage and on screen. But you might be surprised to learn that the man who played Captain Jean-Luc Picard is chancellor of the University of Huddersfield, a 20,000-student university in England.

Stewart was in South Florida this past week for Going Global, an international higher education conference sponsored by the British Council.

Hugo Glendinning

  The four-week run of a rarely done Shakespeare play at the Colony Theatre in Miami Beach could be a defining moment for South Florida theater.

The set for “Antony and Cleopatra” is minimalist.  The costumes, unelaborate.  The play, which chronicles the dying days of ancient Rome’s Second Triumvirate, is a collaboration between another mighty trio – England’s Royal Shakespeare Company, New York’s Public Theater and Miami’s own GableStage.

Hugo Glendinning

It’s a long distance from the rough streets of Liberty City to the bright lights of Stratford-Upon-Avon in England.  But playwright and director Tarell Alvin McCraney has made that journey – and along the way, acquired a resume that would make many artists green with envy.

Graphic Novelists Opt To Kill Shakespeare

Nov 18, 2012
Kill Shakespeare/Anthony Del Col and Conor McCreery

Kill Shakespeare! Those are the first words to which my engineer boyfriend Adam was attracted when we arrived at the Book Fair (other than "ham and cheese croissant"). He beelined to the colorful table and picked up a book with a quill pen drawn on the cover, and we were greeted by Conor McCreery's friendly, "Hello! Do you like graphic novels?" Both Adam and I are fairly indifferent, and I think Conor could tell, but he didn't miss a beat.