Second Amendment

Updated 3:09 p.m. ET

A federal judge in Florida has decided that the National Rifle Association cannot use pseudonyms for teenagers who want to buy guns as part of a legal challenge against new gun laws in Florida.

The judge expressed sympathy for the teenagers, acknowledging that they probably would suffer extreme harassment if their names were public. But, he wrote with evident reluctance, the law was clear that pseudonyms were not allowed.

An increasing number of Americans, both Republicans and Democrats, want more gun regulation, according to a new NPR/Ipsos poll that surveyed people in the aftermath of the Parkland school shooting.

"The Second Amendment."

If you've lived in America, you've heard those words spoken with feeling.

The feeling may have been forceful, even vehement.

"Why? The Second Amendment, that's why."

The same words can be heard uttered in bitterness, as if in blame.

"Why? The Second Amendment, that's why."

Updated at 7:40 p.m. ET

Walmart and Dick's Sporting Goods say they won't sell guns to customers under 21, and both are putting new restrictions on ammunition sales.

Dick's Sporting Goods, one of the largest sports retailers in the U.S., has announced it is immediately ending its sales of military-style semi-automatic rifles and is requiring all customers to be older than 21 to buy a firearm at its stores. Additionally, the company no longer will sell high-capacity magazines.

Bar Jack / Flickr

News Service of Florida

The Second Amendment should supersede a Florida law that bans firearms from state university housing, a gun-rights group argued before seemingly skeptical appellate judges Tuesday.

The 1st District Court of Appeal in Tallahassee heard arguments from Florida Carry Inc., which contends students and other people residing in on-campus housing at the University of Florida should be allowed to maintain possession of firearms as they would at their parents' homes.

Would Amendment Two Put Halloween Candy At Risk?

Oct 28, 2014
Creative Commons via Flickr / Juushika Redgrave (https://flic.kr/p/p3MPT)

Anti-Amendment Two groups in Florida are using Halloween to highlight what, in their opinion, is another strike against the legalization of medical marijuana: marijuana-infused treats called “edibles.”

Rachel Morello / WLRN

Gary Brill is a member of both the National Rifle Association and the U.S. Practical Shooting Association. He's been shooting for almost 30 years, taking part in local competitions, buying his own targets and even making his own bullets at home. You could say he is a firearms fanatic.

"The old saying, 'If you ask how many guns someone has, it’s between more than one and not enough.' So I have more than one and not enough," he says. "A lot of different types: handguns, pistols, semi-automatic, rifles, shotguns."

1969.  Seventh grade.  School trip to an amusement park.  While sitting with a friend in a shaded and secluded spot, I was surrounded by 5 or 6 kids who demanded our ride tickets.  When I stood to my 6-foot-2-inch frame and invited them to try and take my tickets, they decided to pick on someone else.

1975.  A high-school football linebacker decided to test the band major in the boys’ locker room.  Football linebacker had a sore nose.  Band major was unscathed.

http://craigrwhitney.com/

01/02/13 - Wednesday’s Topical Currents is with former New York Times reporter and editor, Craig Whitney.  He reviews the long history of American gun control in his recent book, LIVING WITH GUNS: A Liberal’s Case for the Second Amendment.  Though his book was published before the Connecticut school massacre, Whitney says the rights of Americans to own and use guns can be preserved while also giving the public the right to live in safety. Over 30,000 die from gunshots every year.