seagrass

Daniel Bock / Miami Herald

Biscayne Bay used to be a subtropical paradise with clear water and colorful coral. But urbanization and population growth have polluted the water and imperiled fish, birds, manatees and plants, particularly seagrass.  

Marc Averette via Wikimedia Commons

Biscayne Bay is in trouble. Biologists say about 21 square miles of its seagrass have died off in the past decade. 

Kate Stein / WLRN

A controversial plan to build a reservoir that would help address damaging water discharges in the Everglades ecosystem is one step closer to being enacted — thanks to revisions that take into account the concerns of farmers in the Everglades Agricultural Area.

On Wednesday, Florida’s Senate Appropriations Committee approved a revised version of Senate Bill 10. The bill aims to alleviate blue-green algae on Florida’s coasts by reducing the amount of water that's discharged to the coasts from Lake Okeechobee.

Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission

Seagrass in Florida Bay has died off rapidly over the past couple of years. About 40,000 acres have been lost, harming the habitat of animals from manatees to toadfish and imperiling the area's fishing industry.

Michal Kranz/WLRN

 

As freshwater leaves the Everglades and flows south and east, it enters Biscayne National Park. Today, this pristine water enters Biscayne Bay through a series of manmade canals and helps feed the park’s unique aquatic ecosystems.

The park itself is unlike any other in the country - 95 percent of it is in the Atlantic Ocean. While much of its water is salty, freshwater is critical for the bay’s abundant corals and seagrasses.

 

Grady Caulk, USACE

A cannon believed to be from the early 18th century was uncovered during work on the Miami Harbor Deepening Project last August.  Now, it's being readied to go on display as an artifact of the state.

We don’t know much about this cannon. But there’s a record of salvaged cannons being used as anchors near the Port of Miami.