Sea-Level Rise

Charles Trainor Jr. / Miami Herald

The broad lawn at the Deering Estate at Cutler runs gently downhill to meet Biscayne Bay, washing up between two massive, palm lined jetties to be greeted, on this bright afternoon, by a mass of young people. They flood across the grass, arms and bodies rippling as they surge into lines and circles and lifts in a dance that looks like both prayer and invocation.

“Keep it alive!” exhorts their director, the Miami choreographer Dale Andree, striding the grass in baseball cap and jeans. “You care about it! This is important!”

Keren Bolter

Keren Bolter is a doctoral student of geosciences at Florida Atlantic University researching what areas in South Florida are particularly threatened by rising seas. She says all methods of analysis for the risks of sea-level rise only focus on financial vulnerability -- ranking Fort Lauderdale Beach and Miami Beach as high-risk -- but to her, that's not the whole story.

Christmas 2013 was the best and worst of times for Ralph Gonsalves.

Gonsalves, Prime Minister of the Caribbean island nation of St. Vincent and the Grenadines, met with Pope Francis at the Vatican on Dec. 19. For Gonsalves, an outspoken populist who was about to take over as chairman of the Caribbean Community, or Caricom, it was a moment of valuable political cachet: Francis has proven a champion of poor global underdogs like the small republics of the Caribbean.

Coping With Climate Change In Greenland

Jan 6, 2014
Joe Raedle / Getty Images

Contribution from the Miami Herald

On an inlet nestled between soaring cliffs, huge chunks of ice shimmer from a distance like precious stones on a cocktail ring.

Wilson Sayre

WLRN-Miami Herald News reporter Wilson Sayre spoke on Fusion network's news program DNA with Derrick Ashong to talk about the range of local responses to sea-level rise. She was joined by Andrea Bernstein of WNYC's Transportation Nation.

Kenny Malone / WLRN

Structural engineers don't necessarily view rising sea levels as certain disaster. By definition, it's the job of the engineer to solve design and construction problems caused by environmental changes.

Business journalist Karen Rundlet examines some proposed solutions for sea-level rise. She interviews the University of Miami's Dr. Antonio Nanni about embracing some unusual possibilities. Click play to hear the interview.

Arianna Prothero

Want to see the effects of sea-level rise?  Don’t want to wait 50 years?  Just walk to virtually any coastal area during the natural phenomenon called “King Tide.”

There are plenty of charts, graphs and artist renderings hinting at what South Florida will look like once sea-level rise gets a foothold.  But experts say it’s probably Mother Nature who offers the most vivid preview of things to come.

LISTEN: Sea-Level Rise In South Florida Town Hall

Nov 15, 2013

WLRN-Miami Herald News hosted a coastal-communities town hall on Nov. 7 as part of our more-than-weeklong multimedia series on the effects of sea-level rise, called Elevation Zero: Rising Seas in South Florida.

WLRN anchor Tom Hudson moderated the event, which included a panel of U.S. elected officials from East Coast districts gathered to discuss a response to the threat of rising seas. For more details on the premise, click here.

Nancy Klingener / WLRN

Big Pine Key takes its name from the pine forests that cover the island, about 30 miles from Key West. Rare plants and endangered animals — such as the Key deer — live in those forests.

But now the forests and hammocks are threatened by the rising seas around and beneath them.

Robert Ehrig points to a piece of land that was hardwood hammock when he came to live here 35 years ago.

Sea-Level Rise Will Flood South Florida. Now What?

Nov 15, 2013


On The Florida Roundup, we continue our special coverage, Elevation Zero - Rising Seas in South Florida by looking at the predictions, the policies and the problems.

Host Tom Hudson will be joined by Curtis Morgan of the Miami Herald, Craig Pittman of the Tampa Bay Times, and Alex Chadwick, formerly of NPR and now producer/reporter of BURN: An Energy Journal.