sea level rise

KEENPRESS Photography/flickr

The Evangelical Environmental Network (EEN) has taken up the cause of climate change in Florida. The national group claims 600,000 members or supporters around the country with more than 100,000 of them in Florida. It's funded by donations and grants.

EEN is part of the Floridians for Solar Choice coalition, which is pushing a constitutional amendment that would allow Floridians to buy electricity directly from someone other than a utility company.

Chalk And Rising Seas Combine In Delray Beach

Apr 27, 2015
Lisann Ramos

If you took a stroll through Delray Beach this weekend, you may have noticed a white chalk line on certain sidewalks and roads.

Along three neighborhoods in Delray Beach a group of volunteers pushed a field marker to release three lines of chalk. Each line spans three miles.

The chalk was drawn on the line where scientists project floodwaters will reach in the next major storm. In Delray Beach that’s four feet above sea level.

Lisann Ramos

The confetti has settled from Miami Beach’s week-long birthday bash. Now the city is back to work at combating sea level rise with a panel discussion Monday night at City Hall.

Florida International University is also getting involved in the talks.

“Our biggest strength is reaching out and understand that we don’t know all the solutions and are willing to ask,” said Bruce Mowry, a City of Miami Beach engineer.

The solutions so far include water pumps, dunes, Everglades restoration and seawalls.

Kenny Malone

One way Miami Beach might prepare for the threat of rising sea levels is to elevate the whole city.

“The only tried and true solution to combating rising sea levels is to raise with it,” says Eric Carpenter, public works director for the City of Miami Beach.

As the city celebrates its centennial, the top-level engineer and Miami Beach resident spoke with WLRN about how sea-level rise will affect the city’s next 100 years.

Christine Zenino/flickr

Warmer temperatures are causing glaciers to melt in places like Antarctica and Greenland. What’s in those glaciers may have a significant effect on ecosystems downstream. Those massive chunks of ice harbor a lot of organic carbon – like soot and byproducts from fossil fuel combustion.

All water, from tap water to the oceans, is full of organic carbon in varying forms and concentrations.

Sonya Herbert / whitehouse.gov

On the Florida Roundup, we talk about the week's top stories with the area's journalists.  

SOTU AND CUBA

Miami Herald

Southeast Florida Regional Compact

Absorbing the material at the sixth annual Climate Leadership Summit was a lot like trying to drink from a fire hose. There was a lot of information, much of it technical, dense and very detailed.

The two-day event was a series of expert deep dives into hydrology and re-insurance and risk management.

Vaguely Artistic / Flickr/Creative Commons

      

On The Florida Roundup, review of voting in the 2012 election finds Florida voters waited in line far longer than any other state by more than a half hour. Why? And what’s being done to address it?

Today on WLRN-Miami Herald News, you heard:

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