sea level rise

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President Donald Trump's news conference Tuesday was supposed to be about his executive order on infrastructure.

Most of the attention has gone to his controversial statements blaming "both sides" for violence in Charlottesville during a rally by white supremacists and neo-Nazis.

But the executive order is also receiving some pushback from a South Florida Republican.

The order is supposed to speed up improvements to the nation's roads, bridges and railways.

Kate Stein / WLRN

In South Florida, climate change means higher seas, stronger storms and hotter summers. That could make the region unlivable within a couple hundred years. But scientists say if the world takes steps like reducing carbon emissions, we could buy ourselves some time.

A group of concerned citizens is trying to get that message out.

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Temperatures are getting hotter and the seas are rising, and if we want to stay in South Florida, we’re going to have to adapt. But that can be tricky to talk about. It’s hard to think about the threat of giving up our homes.

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Miami may soon have a large pot of money to pay for infrastructure reinforcements in the face of rising seas.

Thursday, in a narrow vote, the city of Miami decided to put a $400 million bond question to the voters in November.

Last year, the City Commission voted down Mayor Tomas Regalado’s proposed bond plan. Commissioner Ken Russell was one of those no votes.

He told the mayor to get more public input on how to use the money generated through the bonds.

Gustavo Rodriguez

In certain circles, people from the Netherlands inevitably get asked about sea level rise.

It's because for hundreds of years the country has had to keep out seawater and prevent flooding from its numerous rivers.

A massive iceberg the size of Delaware has broken free from Antarctica and is floating in the sea.

Earlier Wednesday, scientists announced that the 6,000-square-kilometer (about 2,300 square miles) iceberg had come loose, after satellites detected it had calved off the Larsen C ice shelf on the Antarctic Peninsula.

According to new research, Central Florida will be one of the top destinations for residents displaced by sea level rise in the coming century.

The University of Georgia study is believed to be the first to examine how sea level rise will reshape the nation's population inland.

Windsor Johnson / NPR

Climate change is going to cause disproportionate economic harm to parts of the United States that are already pretty hot, according to a study published in the journal Science.

The study by scientists and economists from the Climate Impact Lab suggests rising temperatures could increase a national income gap.

Kate Stein / WLRN

When it comes to water, South Florida has a lot in common with the Netherlands. Both regions are close to sea level and rely on canals, seawalls and pumps to prevent flooding. And both face an increasing threat from sea-level rise.

So it makes sense that Dutch officials and South Florida leaders exchange a lot of advice on resiliency.

NASA

Should we stay or should we go?

That's the question on the minds of Florida leaders reacting to President Trump's decision last week to withdraw the United States from the Paris climate accord. The accord is intended to limit carbon emissions that drive up global temperatures, worsening storms and intensifying sea level rise.

The president claims it costs U.S. energy and manufacturing jobs.

Kate Stein / WLRN

South Floridians are seeing the impacts of climate change firsthand, in sunny-day flooding and record-breaking temperatures as recently as Memorial Day weekend.

That's why for many, President Trump's decision Thursday to withdraw the U.S. from the Paris climate accords constituted a betrayal.

Rilea Group

 

Development and sea level rise are two things Miami is known for. And they go hand-in-hand, as developers and local officials plan how to make buildings resilient against water that could rise three to six feet by 2100.

 

Kate Stein / WLRN

For the second weekend in a row, protesters marched across the country against President Donald Trump's policies.

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