sea level rise

Florida Institute for Health Innovation

Floridians with chronic diseases like asthma and COPD may have one more problem to worry about: sea-level rise.

The Health And Sea Level Rise: Impacts on South Florida report released Monday maps out sea-level rise projections alongside health data from Palm Beach County down to the Keys—and there were some surprises about who’s at risk.

Epidemiology Congress of the Americas

Climate change isn’t just an environmental problem. If you ask Michael McGeehin, climate change is a health crisis.

McGeehin is an epidemiologist who spent more than 30 years at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. He developed the CDC’s Climate Change Program.

McGeehin was recently in Miami for an international epidemiology conference. And he spoke with Health News Florida about how public health is threatened by changing rain patterns, sea level rise and heat waves:

Laura Coburn/WLRN

Dr. Harold Wanless researches climate change as chair of the Department of Geological Sciences at the University of Miami in Coral Gables. He documents coastal erosion caused by hurricane damage – and the impact of sea-level rise.  

Wanless calls South Florida the poster child for climate change.

Millions of years of Florida's history are lying on a table in Paulette McFadden's office at the University of Florida in Gainesville. It's in long metal tubes containing several feet of sediment from Horseshoe Beach, a community on Florida's Gulf coast.

"This core," McFadden says, "actually spans about 30 million years."

MARSHA HALPER / Miami Herald

Different groups have different predictions for how much the sea levels will rise in the coming century.  The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change predicts seas will rise by more than three feet by the end of this century, the United States Army Corps of Engineers says five feet and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration predicts up to six and a half feet.  So what do we do about it?

The Future Of North Beach Is Up For Grabs

Mar 24, 2016
James Teeple

The future of Miami Beach’s North Beach neighborhood is up for grabs. People who like the sleepy, low-rise neighborhood that stretches from 63rd Street to 87th Street call it funky, but those who want change call it faded. 

In February, North Beach residents, city officials, town planners and even some developers met at a “charrette” or design workshop to hash out ideas for a future North Beach. The workshop was organized by Dover Kohl and Associates, the town planning firm that’s been selected by the city of Miami Beach to develop a master plan for North Beach. 

Washington Post

Two presidential debates are coming to Miami this week.

Republican candidates will debate at the University of Miami Thursday night. But first, Democrats will take the stage Wednesday night at the Kendall campus of Miami Dade College.

Twenty-one mayors – most of them from South Florida – sent a letter to the moderators for both debates. The mayors want the candidates to explain how they plan to deal with climate change and sea level rise.

Gina Jordan/WLRN

House minority leader Mark Pafford, D-West Palm Beach, is finishing up his last regular legislative session.

He's leaving because of term limits. "This process is better when you have new minds and fresh ideas," Pafford says. For the record, he doesn't like term limits and calls his departure an "involuntary constitutional resignation." 

Valters Boze/flickr

A climate change litmus test has been circulating around Tallahassee. The man behind the test wants to get lawmakers and other state leaders on the record about their feelings regarding climate change and the risk to Florida.

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Emily Michot / Miami Herald

South Florida leaders attended the annual Southeast Florida Regional Climate Leadership Summit in Key West this week to come up with real solutions for combatting the effects of climate change, like sea-level rise.

“For the short-term there is a dramatic need to come to agreement with regards to some of the infrastructure standards,” said Jennifer Jurado, the director of Broward County Environmental Planning and Community Resilience Division.

The composer John Luther Adams calls himself "deeply, deeply Alaskan." That's where the 62-year-old lived almost his entire adult life, and he still has his cabin in the woods where he's written so much of his music. But now he and his wife split their time between an apartment in New York City and a house in Mexico right next to the Pacific Ocean.

City of Key West

  While international leaders gather in Paris to look for global approaches to climate change, South Florida's leaders gathered in Key West. They are already immersed in dealing with the issue. Sometimes literally.

"When there is coastal flooding as a result of king tides, such as what we had a couple weeks ago, I can tell you I was up to my knees in the communities in my district," said Palm Beach County Commissioner Steven Abrams. "Local government is the first responder to the impacts of climate change."

Emily Michot / Miami Herald

On Wednesday, South Florida will go through another King Tide. Not sure what to expect, except maybe closed roads and cars on flooded streets. 

Miami Beach is trying to get ahead of the problem, which is a consequence of rising seas. The city is spending hundreds of millions of dollars on pump stations, higher roads and seawalls.

Jayme Gershen/Eve Mosher/flickr

Twenty university professors, including a few from Florida, sent a letter to the White House in September asking for an investigation of corporations that deny - and simultaneously profit from - the effects of climate change. The group says the actions of these organizations have been extensively documented in peer reviewed academic research.

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