science

Congratulations are in order, kind of, for a few exemplary researchers and one massive multinational corporation.

This year's Ig Nobel awards — the rather-less-noble-than-the-Nobel awards for "improbable" research and accomplishments — were announced Thursday night.

The honorees included a man who lived as a goat, a man who lived as a badger, a man who put tiny pants on rats and tracked their sex lives, a team who investigated the personalities of rocks, and Volkswagen.

A group of nano-scientists has discovered a way to arrange individual atoms to store and rewrite data 500 times more efficiently than the best hard drives on the market.

Researchers are developing a system to teach robots how to feel pain.

NASA called off today's effort to inflate an expandable module attached to the International Space Station after its first attempt fell flat.

Florida's Coral Getting Help From Hundreds Of Miles Away

Mar 4, 2016
James St. John / Wikimedia Commons

Some coral in the Florida Keys are breeding with coral 1,000 miles away more than they are with coral on the very same reef, according to a new study from the University of Miami.

Grant Helps UCF Researches Uncover Early Planetary Formation

Dec 29, 2015
UCF

An experiment looking at the very beginnings of planetary formation is getting a ride on a sub-orbital rocket funded by NASA.

In the early stages of planetary formation, there’s no gravity. So how do particles stick together? That’s what researcher Julie Brisset hopes to find out.

She’s sending a whole bunch of particles on a sub-orbital rocket. As the experiment falls, it experiences micro-gravity.

sites.fiu.edu/stem/

08/17/15 - Monday’s Topical Currents addresses higher education, and the acronym of “STEM”:  That’s Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics.

Marsha Halper / Miami Herald Staff

This weekend the Patricia and Phillip Frost Museum of Science in Coconut Grove will be hosting its last Scientist Sunday at its current location before moving to its new home in downtown Miami next year.

The events are held on the first Sunday of each month and feature scientists who are doing research in the community through the museum's Science Communication Fellows Program.

NOAA: Saharan Dust Clouds Suppressing Hurricanes

Jul 7, 2015
NRL-Monterey

South Florida's air has been dustier than usual this week. 

The dust has come from across the Atlantic, originating from dust storms in the Sahara desert and being pushed towards the Americas by winds and tropical waves.

While the current influx of dust-filled air may be a hazard for people with respiratory conditions, scientists say it also brings with it a more positive effect.

Flickr/mathias appel

Should chimpanzees -- humanity's closest living relatives in the animal kingdom -- have the same rights that you do?

A South Florida attorney says they should.  And while Steven Wise hasn't gotten a judge to agree with him yet, he did get a New York State Supreme Court justice last week to admit that the idea was "extremely interesting and well argued."  

In a new study, a team of scientists says there’s a definite link between the massive BP oil spill in 2010 and a record number of dolphin deaths along the northern Gulf of Mexico.

The scientists said large numbers of dead bottlenose dolphins found stranded along shores since the spill suffered from lung and adrenal lesions caused by swimming in oil-contaminated seas.

The research paper backs up previous findings linking dolphin deaths to the oil spill.

John O'Connor / StateImpact Florida

Rain is terrible when you’re trying to give tours of your new garden.

But it’s great for the spinach, sweet potatoes and purple passion fruit rapidly taking root.

On a very rainy day, Kelsey Pharr Elementary third graders Ronnield Luna and Jeffrey Arroyo are showing grownups around what used to be a grass field.

Now the school in Miami’s Brownsville neighborhood has several thousand square feet of all kinds of fruit and vegetables.

Some you can find at your supermarket.

Patricia and Phillip Frost Museum of Science

Science innovators got a challenge today as the Patricia and Phillip Frost Museum of Science announced a new innovation fellowship it will offer starting in 2016. Two will be offered the first year: one for an invention to restore coral reefs and the other to help reduce people’s exposure to carcinogens.

The winner will get $100,000 to support the 12- to 18-month fellowship.

The money is part of a $1 million gift from Ted Caplow, CEO of Caplow Applied Science or CappSci, who has served various roles at the science museum in the past three years.

Wikimedia Commons

Celestially minded Miamians (and anyone else interested) will be able to view the International Space Station (ISS) with the naked eye Thursday morning, according to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

NASA’s “Spot the Station” widget identifies specific dates and times that the ISS will be visible without a telescope.

These windows, however, are narrow — the next opportunity for viewing the ISS will occur Thursday at 5:47 a.m., and it will only be visible for two minutes.

NASA's new Orion spacecraft returned to dry land in Southern California after a test flight that ended with a plunge into the Pacific Ocean.

Navy ship, the USS Anchorage, delivered the capsule to Naval Base San Diego and unloaded the 11-foot-tall cone around 10 p.m. PST Monday.

Orion made an unmanned flight Friday that carried it 3,600 miles above Earth to test the spacecraft's systems before it carries astronauts on deep space missions. During re-entry into the atmosphere, the spacecraft endured speeds of 20,000 mph and temperatures near 4,000 degrees Fahrenheit.

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