Science

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NRL-Monterey

South Florida's air has been dustier than usual this week. 

The dust has come from across the Atlantic, originating from dust storms in the Sahara desert and being pushed towards the Americas by winds and tropical waves.

While the current influx of dust-filled air may be a hazard for people with respiratory conditions, scientists say it also brings with it a more positive effect.

DANIEL BOCK / FOR THE MIAMI HERALD

Florida wildlife officials are hosting another snake hunt, but they don't want to call it a hunt. It's the Python Challenge. It's not likely to put much of a dent on the growing population of the invasive species, but that doesn't mean the event will be a failure.

blacktechweek.com

Techies from across the country and the world have come together this week to celebrate diversity in the tech industry.

The first ever Black Tech Week is taking place this week with events all around Miami. 

Twenty-two-year-old Delane Parnell works for a venture capital firm that funds tech startups. This makes him a hot commodity at Black Tech. Parnell was a speaker at one of the events at the conference.

Patricia and Phillip Frost Museum of Science

Science innovators got a challenge today as the Patricia and Phillip Frost Museum of Science announced a new innovation fellowship it will offer starting in 2016. Two will be offered the first year: one for an invention to restore coral reefs and the other to help reduce people’s exposure to carcinogens.

The winner will get $100,000 to support the 12- to 18-month fellowship.

The money is part of a $1 million gift from Ted Caplow, CEO of Caplow Applied Science or CappSci, who has served various roles at the science museum in the past three years.

Wikimedia Commons

Celestially minded Miamians (and anyone else interested) will be able to view the International Space Station (ISS) with the naked eye Thursday morning, according to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

NASA’s “Spot the Station” widget identifies specific dates and times that the ISS will be visible without a telescope.

These windows, however, are narrow — the next opportunity for viewing the ISS will occur Thursday at 5:47 a.m., and it will only be visible for two minutes.

NASA's new Orion spacecraft returned to dry land in Southern California after a test flight that ended with a plunge into the Pacific Ocean.

Navy ship, the USS Anchorage, delivered the capsule to Naval Base San Diego and unloaded the 11-foot-tall cone around 10 p.m. PST Monday.

Orion made an unmanned flight Friday that carried it 3,600 miles above Earth to test the spacecraft's systems before it carries astronauts on deep space missions. During re-entry into the atmosphere, the spacecraft endured speeds of 20,000 mph and temperatures near 4,000 degrees Fahrenheit.

Sheryl Sandberg's Mom Cares About Your Hearing

Dec 8, 2014
Emily Michot / Miami Herald

Three years ago, when the noise level at the American Airlines Arena shrieked to a deafening level, fan Adele Sandberg covered her ears and winced. Intent on the fast-paced court action, she didn’t yet know about the growing danger of hearing loss. She didn’t know yet that preventing it would become her passion.

Jacob Katel / WLRN

Gourmet waffles, spiced Cuban coffee and Miami tech are free every Wednesday in Wynwood where free breakfast is served alongside startup pitches and presentations.

The event is hosted by Live Ninja, a locally based video chat company that has raised over $1 million in venture capital and secured sponsorship for this series of breakfasts from the Knight Foundation.

International Space Station (via Instagram at http://instagram.com/iss)

At some point during his studies at Florida Atlantic University, astronaut Steve Swanson started thinking about his future. Perhaps it could involve space travel.

Eventually, Swanson did become an engineer for NASA. He took two shuttle missions to the International Space Station between 2007 and 2009. His last trip began in March of this year, when he took a Russian rocket back to the ISS for a six-month tour.

Wilson Sayre / WLRN

At the center of the Patricia and Phillip Frost Museum of Science’s Planetarium stands a masterpiece of its time: the Spitz Model B Space Transit Projector, a 1960s state-of-the-art machine that's the last of its kind still in use.

Forty-eight years ago, this heap of black aluminum began dazzling Miamians with the brilliance of an unadulterated night sky. In light of the museum's planned move to a new downtown building, the projector will probably not see another year of use.

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