robert runcie

Charles Trainor Jr.

Broward County is taking a closer look at how schools address punishment amid criticism that its controversial PROMISE program encouraged a culture of lax discipline throughout the district.

CARL JUSTE / Miami Herald

Superintendent Robert Runcie opened a community forum on Monday night by saying he’s not a liar.

“There are some out there that are concerned that somehow we misled the public. Some will say we lied. I mean, I’ve heard all of it,” Runcie said during a “workshop” on a disciplinary program known as PROMISE.

TNS (via Miami Herald)

After denying for months that Parkland shooter Nikolas Cruz had any connection to a program created to soften school punishment and reduce student arrests — and characterizing assertions to the contrary as "fake news" — the Broward County school district is now acknowledging that Cruz was in fact referred to its PROMISE program.

Jessica Bakeman / WLRN News

Dozens of students, parents and school staff members lined up at two microphones in the auditorium at Plantation High School on Wednesday night to share their fear and anger with Broward school district leaders.

David Santiago / Miami Herald

Broward County Schools Superintendent Robert Runcie said a school safety forum planned for Wednesday night will be the first of many.

Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School sophomore Annabel Claprood and her mom, Elyse, arrived at the Florida Capitol on a recent morning with a schedule, a map and a mission.

Charles Trainor Jr. / Miami Herald

The superintendent of Broward County schools said a campus cop's decision not to enter the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School building where a shooter killed 17 on Feb. 14 was "inexcusable" and "despicable."

Referring to school resource officer Scot Peterson, Robert Runcie told reporters gathered outside the school on Friday morning: "I wish he had the same kind of courage that our teachers that have showed up here today have."

Matias Ocner / Miami Herald

Not even two weeks after a shooter fired more than 100 bullets in the hallways of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, students and staff are returning to the campus fearful of emotional triggers that could force them to relive the traumatic event.

Al Diaz / Miami Herald

A group of elementary school students opened Broward County’s first school board meeting since last week’s Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School shooting by reciting the pledge of allegiance and singing the national anthem.

The kids were in their classroom at Griffin Elementary School in Cooper City, but they appeared via livestream video. They weren’t there to see how their performance was received, how poignant it seemed, as their community mourned 14 other children and three staff members who were slaughtered in the Valentine’s Day mass shooting.

Caitie Switalski / WLRN News

It was an unusual night at South Plantation High School Thursday. Plenty of kids stayed late for football practice and club meetings, but some also stayed for the chance to ask their superintendent to make changes in their education. 

Robert Runcie, superintendent of Broward County Schools,  and Laurie Rich Levinson, school board member for District 6, were on deck at a student-run forum to explain how they make decisions.

“Hello there” - the email started. “There is something you should know about, taking place tomorrow of 12-17-15 - Thursday.”

That was the email message received by the Houston Independent School District. A similar email came into the inboxes of school officials here in South Florida.

The emails threatened to blow up school buildings with pressure cookers bombs.

Broward County School District

South Florida school leaders traveled to Washington Wednesday to share ideas on how to reduce on-campus arrests and suspensions.

Superintendents from Broward County and Miami-Dade County shared how their districts dealt with the problem at a summit hosted by the White House.

Research shows that students who are suspended before ninth grade are less likely to graduate. And on-campus arrests can stick with a student for life, hindering chances at a college education or finding a job.

Extra Ketchup

Technical problems this week delayed testing in Miami-Dade, Broward and Palm Beach counties. Testing didn't resume until three days later on Thursday.

The Florida Senate moved forward with a bill to limit testing.

Gov. Rick Scott gave an upbeat State of the State address in the midst of a challenging start to his administration's second term.

Miami-Dade, Broward and Palm Beach counties' legislative delegations take their priority measures to Tallahassee.

The Miami International Film Festival kicks off today.