Since 1960, the Democrats were the party that nominated new generation candidates. Three of them — Kennedy, Clinton and Obama — won the White House. Republicans nominated old guys, whether they lost — think Dole, McCain and Romney — or won, like Ronald Reagan. But this year, the geezers are on the Democratic side. Hillary Clinton is 67, Bernie Sanders is 74 and, if he gets in, Joe Biden is 72. On the Republican side, for a change, it's a completely different story.

Mark Wallheiser / Associated Press

News Service of Florida

Republican presidential candidate Jeb Bush returned Monday to Tallahassee, where he spent eight years as governor, to introduce proposals for fixing the federal government.

Bush, seeking to portray himself as a Washington outsider, laid out plans for civil-service and congressional reforms, including plans to push for constitutional amendments that would require a balanced budget and give the president line-item veto power on appropriation bills.

GOP Not Slowing FL Obamacare Enrollment

Feb 3, 2015

When Florida workers promoting President Barack Obama's health care marketplace want instant feedback, they go to an online "heat map." The map turns darker green where they've seen the most people and shows bright red dots for areas where enrollment is high.

With the Department of Homeland Security’s funding deadline less than a month away, Republicans and Democrats are gearing up for what may be the next stage in Congress’ fight on President Obama’s immigration policies.

House Republicans have already passed their own version of DHS funding that would also block the president’s November immigration orders and deport up to four million immigrants living in the U.S. illegally.

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Florida Immigrant Coalition

Citing a more tolerant political atmosphere and a developing need for workers, leading Florida conservatives are calling on Congress to support and pass comprehensive immigration reform.

One good reason:  It would renew the state's dwindling supply of warm bodies.

"Our birthrate is about 1.7 per couple. We're not even replacing ourselves now," warned Ed Moore, president of the Florida Center Right Coalition, one of three noted conservatives who joined former state GOP chairman Al Cárdenas in a conference call with state reporters.

Gina Jordan/WLRN

Ft. Walton Beach Republican Representative Matt Gaetz is helping carry on the family name in politics.

One week shy of 32 years old, he’s one of the state’s youngest lawmakers. He’s now running for the state Senate. His dad is Senate President Don Gaetz, also a Panhandle Republican.

But Matt Gaetz is an attorney who is not just sitting in his dad’s shadow.

Florida’s Republican leaders announced their policy goals last month for the upcoming legislative session.

06/05/13 - Wednesday's Topical Currents is with lifelong moderate Republican attorney Barbara Olschner. After a 28-year legal career, she decided to run for a U.S. Congressional seat in the ultra-conservative Florida panhandle. She was swamped by tea party attacks, branded as an elitist, and finished dead last. In her book, THE RELUCTANT REPUBLICAN, she details the harrowing experience. That’s Topical CurrentsWednesday at 1pm on WLRN-HD1 rebroadcast at 7pm on WLRN-HD2 and audio on-demand after the live program. 

Republicans Like Their Chances In Florida

Oct 22, 2012

Reporters from Politico are among the media mob in Boca Raton, where President Obama and Mitt Romney will meet for the last debate tonight at Lynn University, and what they have detected is a pronounced Republican swagger.

Why is the GOP so confident of its chances in the nation's largest swing state? Polling, mostly, among other persuasive reasons, plus the great gift of our state economy remaining in the tank. But the Democrats are not wholly despondent, writes Politico: