12/22/14 - Monday's Topical Currents: Millions of Americans who aren’t religious feel a bit excluded from many friends and relatives during the holiday season.   Professor of sociology and secular studies Phil Zuckerman has researched those whose religious beliefs have waned . . .

News Service of Florida

We told you the Satanic Temple was preparing to file a lawsuit this week against the state of Florida. Now, those plans have been dropped because the temple is being allowed to put up a holiday display inside the Capitol. 

The display depicts an angel falling into a pit of fire. It’s scheduled to go up on December 22. It includes a banner with the words "Happy holidays from the Satanic Temple.”

Nadege Green / WLRN

Before Cardinal Chibly Langlois celebrated Mass at Notre Dame D’Haiti Catholic Church in Little Haiti, he took it all in.

A banner with his likeness hung from a black fence.

Parishioners wore yellow T-shirts with a picture of his face on the front and on the back, a message in Creole thanking God for blessing them with the first-ever Haitian cardinal.

Earlier this year, Pope Francis named Langlois cardinal, making him the first Haitian in history to hold that post.

Rick Stone

Miami's downtrodden, disenfranchised and undocumented probably have no greater friend than Bishop Leopold Frade, spiritual leader of Southeast Florida's 33,000 Episcopalians.

Jessica Meszaros / WLRN

Roman Catholic Mass was at one time universally celebrated in Latin, the ancient Roman language.

After the second Vatican Council in the 1960s, Mass was allowed to be celebrated in the language of the people, meaning Mass in Peru was celebrated in Spanish and Mass in the United States was celebrated in English -- you get the picture.

Latin is now sometimes referred to as “the dead language,” but it is not dead in Miami.

In Detroit, a group of Catholics borrowed the idea of flash mobs for "Mass mobs" to help revitalize urban churches.

Every month, a group called Detroit Mass Mobs picks a church, spreads the word on Facebook — and just like that, it fills up and buzzes with the energy it once had.

Jessica Meszaros / WLRN

The Episcopal Church of the Intercession first opened its doors in Fort Lauderdale in the late 1950s. But churchgoers dwindled over recent years and the church couldn't afford to stay open. Its members celebrated mass for the last time this past Sunday.

Reverend Fred H. Johnson Jr. was called to the church three years ago as a supply priest, something a little like a substitute teacher.

As Ramadan Comes To A Close, Local Muslims Come Together To Break Fast

Jul 25, 2014
Constanza Gallardo / WLRN

The Islamic holy month of Ramadan is coming to a close. During Ramadan, Muslims fast during the day -- no food or drink. They break the fast with a meal after sundown called iftar. (See our Unique Eats: Ramadan Edition.)

Sholom Neistein

Mohamed Ghumrawi and Sholom Neistein have been friends for six years.

Sholom is Jewish. Mohamed is Muslim and of Palestinian descent. 

"I think it’s interesting how people perceive our friendship," says Mohamed, or Moe for short. "People see us and the first thing that comes to mind is, 'A Palestinian and an Israeli together? What? I must be in the "Twilight Zone".' ”

Tim Padgett / WLRN

To gauge how dramatically things have changed in the Latino community, look no farther than the gold chain around Marisol Medina’s neck.

The necklace, which Medina’s devoutly Roman Catholic mother gave her, once held a cross – which has been replaced by a globe.

“It represents my shift from religion,” says Medina, “to the world, which I now believe in more than the cross or religion.”