race

This viral video out of Hollywood raises an interesting question: What does racism look like from one Latino to another?

Updated at 2:30 a.m. ET Tuesday
By the end of the day on Monday, three CEOs had announced they were leaving President Trump's American Manufacturing Council. Merck CEO Kenneth Frazier was the first to announce his resignation followed by Under Armour's Kevin Plank and Intel's Brian Krzanich.

The resignations came after Trump was criticized for his response to the violence at white supremacist events in Charlottesville, Va., over the weekend. The president, famous for his ability to be direct and forceful, was faulted for condemning violence "on many sides."

Since its inception nearly a decade ago, Airbnb has faced questions from people of color as to whether the company's worldwide "vacancy" sign really applied to them.

The company has been plagued by allegations and several lawsuits, predominantly but not exclusively from African-Americans, claiming discrimination.

The NAACP has issued a travel advisory for the state of Missouri, citing recent "race-based incidents" and new state legislation that makes it harder for fired employees to prove racial discrimination.

It's the first time the national civil rights organization has issued a travel warning for an entire state, the Kansas City Star reports.

The group warns "African American travelers, visitors and Missourians" to "exercise extreme caution" in the state.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions on Tuesday attended a conference for black law enforcement officials and promoted his new crime-fighting agenda. Much of the attention, however, went to some recent comments by President Trump that officers should not to be "too nice" to suspects in custody.

When Sessions walked into the hotel ballroom in Atlanta, the reception was professional and polite. Sessions spoke to members of the National Organization of Black Law Enforcement Executives and lamented the damage crime does to struggling neighborhoods.

Updated at 4:10 p.m. ET

Members of the oldest civil rights organization in the U.S., the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, are heading into their annual meeting with no speaker from the White House and a new interim president and CEO. The meeting started Saturday in Baltimore.

Harsh life experiences appear to leave African-Americans vulnerable to Alzheimer's and other forms of dementia, researchers reported Sunday at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference in London.

Several teams presented evidence that poverty, disadvantage and stressful life events are strongly associated with cognitive problems in middle age and dementia later in life among African-Americans.

Updated at 9:40 a.m. ET Wednesday

Newly released dashcam video footage shows the brief interaction that ended with police officer Jeronimo Yanez shooting and killing motorist Philando Castile in July 2016.

Minnesota Public Radio has posted the video of the stop that turned into tragedy in just eight seconds. A warning: the video includes graphic content and language some viewers may find disturbing.

Nadege Green / WLRN

Clarence Dickson was the first black graduate of the City of Miami's police academy and he rose to become Miami’s first black police chief in 1985.

Steve Snodgrass / flickr

Florida Sen. Frank Artiles, a Republican, resigned last month after the Miami Herald revealed he had said the n-word and called a fellow senator, Audrey Gibson, a “bitch”.

Artiles also referred to Gibson, a black woman, as “girl.”

American Indian and Alaska Native families are much more likely to have an infant die suddenly and unexpectedly, and that risk has remained higher than in other ethnic groups since public health efforts were launched to prevent sudden infant death syndrome in the 1990s. African-American babies also face a higher risk, a study finds.

At the same baseball game that saw Boston Red Sox fans make amends with a player targeted by racial slurs at Fenway Park, one fan reportedly used a slur to comment on a singer — and that fan has now been banned from the stadium.

"Yes, it was a racial comment," Red Sox club President Sam Kennedy said, according to the team. "It was a racial comment used to describe the national anthem that was taking place, the performance of the national anthem. It was sickening to hear."

Jordan Edwards, a high school freshman, was leaving a house party in a Dallas suburb late Saturday night with several friends when police officers arrived outside. The officers were investigating a complaint about noisy teenagers in the neighborhood, and they had heard gunshots in the area as they approached.

Within minutes, the black 15-year-old passenger had been killed — shot in the head by an officer through the front passenger window and pronounced dead at the hospital shortly afterward.

No matter what variation of the “n-word” is spoken, a Florida state senator is learning the term is still offensive as Democrats and Republicans admonished him for using it during an exchange with two African-American colleagues.

Miami Herald

Amid calls for his resignation, Sen. Frank Artiles, R-Miami, apologized publicly  Wednesday morning for a tirade at a club that included making derogatory comments about a fellow senator and using a racial slur. 

“I extend a heartfelt apology to my colleagues and to all those I have offended,” said Artiles from the Senate floor. 

Artiles specifically apologized to Sen. Audrey Gibson, D-Jacksonville, Sen. Perry Thurston, D-Fort Lauderdale, and Senate President Joe Negron, R-Stuart.

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