Political news

Jason Parker/Flickr

The biggest game in sports is coming back to South Florida. The Miami Dolphins will host the Super Bowl in 2020, celebrating a century of the NFL. But is this Miami’s game - or is it South Florida's game? Should the branding leave out Broward County?

Roberto Koltun / El Nuevo Herald staff

A Miami Charter Review Committee has been looking into the idea that the city of Miami should have a strong mayor. Currently it is an executive mayor position, which makes it a mostly figurehead post.

Commissioner Francis Suarez is leading the push to make the  mayor of Miami more powerful and explains why the issue should be taken to the voters. 


There have been three deaths of cyclists on the Rickenbacker Causeway in the past five years. The 2012 death of Allen Cohen, led to the creation of the Aaron Cohen Life Protection Act, a law that puts larger penalties on motorists who hit cyclists. 

Tim Padgett / WLRN.org

A recent poll shows presidential candidates Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton are neck-and-neck in Florida. As a result, one voter bloc will likely be key to winning the state – and, since this is Florida, maybe the election.

Last week’s Quinnipiac University survey shows presumptive Democratic candidate Clinton leading de facto Republican nominee Trump in Florida by just one percentage point – 43 to 42.

Eraldo Peres / AP via Miami Herald


Luis Almagro, the secretary general of the Organization of American States, made a particularly sensible point when I talked to him during his visit to Miami this week.

The recent normalization of U.S.-Cuba relations, Almagro said, is good for the Western Hemisphere because it “has changed the logic of relations between Latin America and the United States.”

Miami Herald

We recently spoke with Mayor Eugene Flinn of Palmetto Bay and Vice Mayor James McDonald of Pinecrest about the debate between new bus lines versus more rail.

The county has a plan for $115 million  to go toward a Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) system in the South Dade.

Gov. Rick Scott Signs Death-Benefits Bill For First Responders

Apr 8, 2016
City of Coral Gables Facebook

Gov. Rick Scott signed a measure Friday that will help families of first responders who are enrolled in the Florida Retirement System and get killed in the line of duty.

The death-benefits bill (SB 7012), a priority of Senate President Andy Gardiner, R-Orlando, was among 17 bills Scott signed into law.

"When people give their lives in the service of our state, the least we can do is make sure we help provide for the families they leave behind," Gardiner said in a prepared statement.

The law covers first responders killed since July 1, 2013.

Federal Judge Closes Books On Florida Gay Marriage Ban

Mar 31, 2016
Peetje2 / Creative Commons/Flickr

More than a year after same-sex marriages began in Florida, a federal judge on Thursday issued a final judgment declaring that Florida's voter-approved prohibition against gay marriage is unconstitutional.

In a harshly worded ruling, U.S. District Judge Robert Hinkle rejected state officials' arguments that a final order in the Florida case was unnecessary due to a seminal U.S. Supreme Court decision last year that struck down state bans on same-sex marriages nationwide.

Desmond Boylan / AP

President Obama's visit to Cuba this week drew criticism from Miami and praise from Cubans.

Cubans in Havana watched President Obama speak directly to them on live television, knowing that Cuban president Raul Castro was in the same room listening on. 

"I want the Cuban people, especially the young people, to understand why I believe that you should look to the future with hope, not the false promise which insists that things are better than they really are, or the blind optimism that says all your problems can go away tomorrow," said President Obama in a speech in Havana.

Tom Hudson / WLRN

President Obama is going to Cuba this weekend.

WLRN's Tom Hudson and Tim Padgett are there awaiting Obama's visit. What is the mood in Havana ahead of the historic trip? And they're looking at the changes that have occurred since the two nations started talking again.

Donald Trump looks like the Republican nominee in this presidential election, while Florida's Senator Marco Rubio is back in the halls of the senate, now that’s he no longer running for president. But, what do we make of his claim that he won’t return to politics after January?

Miami Herald

The 2016 Florida legislative session was a much more conciliatory affair -- compared to last year's session that ended early and went to extra sessions. On Thursday, Gov. Rick Scott signed the $82.3 billion budget. He stuck to his earlier announcement of 256-million-dollars in line-item vetoes.

 Why the governor announced so early what he was going to veto.

Paul Sancya / AP via Miami Herald

From savior to suspended.

Florida Senator Marco Rubio - whom Time Magazine just a few years ago hailed as the Republican Party's "savior" - suspended his presidential campaign last night after losing his home state’s primary in a devastating landslide to Donald Trump. The political post-mortems on Rubio have begun – and so have the questions about his future.

Late For Early Voting In Hollywood

Mar 15, 2016
Caitlin Granfield

When people entered the Hollywood Branch Library on Tuesday to vote in the presidential primary, they learned that they were two days too late.

They said Broward’s online voter information page wasn’t clear and that they thought they could vote there through Tuesday.

Nonetheless, people like Christian Bauman, a 29 year-old Hollywood resident, hoped he could squeeze in his vote elsewhere.

He said he’s been a lifelong Democrat.

The Florida Primary: Who Voted and Why

Mar 15, 2016
John Power / WLRN

South Florida voters shared their thoughts, voiced their opinions and told us which candidates they voted for in the Florida primary election. Listen to them talk about why. 

Edward Hannaway, voted for Bernie Sanders

"If the guy was a street sweeper I'd vote for him."

Linda Lane, voted for Hillary Clinton

"Probably everything that's opposite of what the Republicans stand for."

Elise Marilles, voted for Bernie Sanders

Why Vote? (When You Could Be On Miami Beach)

Mar 15, 2016
Pietro and Silvia / Flickr

           It was 85 degrees and breezy with a spotless sky on Miami Beach Tuesday afternoon—not exactly weather to make you roll up your towel and head for the polls.  K’Teyah Dumoy, sprawled in the sand with family visiting from Canada, says she usually votes. But Tuesday? "It’s such a perfect day at the beach, so..."