Politics

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Late For Early Voting In Hollywood

Mar 15, 2016
Caitlin Granfield

When people entered the Hollywood Branch Library on Tuesday to vote in the presidential primary, they learned that they were two days too late.

They said Broward’s online voter information page wasn’t clear and that they thought they could vote there through Tuesday.

Nonetheless, people like Christian Bauman, a 29 year-old Hollywood resident, hoped he could squeeze in his vote elsewhere.

He said he’s been a lifelong Democrat.

The Florida Primary: Who Voted and Why

Mar 15, 2016
John Power / WLRN

South Florida voters shared their thoughts, voiced their opinions and told us which candidates they voted for in the Florida primary election. Listen to them talk about why. 

Edward Hannaway, voted for Bernie Sanders

"If the guy was a street sweeper I'd vote for him."

Linda Lane, voted for Hillary Clinton

"Probably everything that's opposite of what the Republicans stand for."

Elise Marilles, voted for Bernie Sanders

Why Vote? (When You Could Be On Miami Beach)

Mar 15, 2016
Pietro and Silvia / Flickr

           It was 85 degrees and breezy with a spotless sky on Miami Beach Tuesday afternoon—not exactly weather to make you roll up your towel and head for the polls.  K’Teyah Dumoy, sprawled in the sand with family visiting from Canada, says she usually votes. But Tuesday? "It’s such a perfect day at the beach, so..."

Navy Veteran Favors Clinton Over Trump

Mar 15, 2016
Caitlin Granfield

  Workers at the Hallandale Beach Cultural Center said there was a steady flow of voters on Tuesday morning, but by noon just a trickle of people could be found there.

Jarrett Edward Fulton, of Liberty City, came there to repair a van in the parking lot. A Navy veteran, and proud grandfather of 22, he recently voted for Hillary Clinton on his absentee ballot.

He thinks the general election will come down to her and Donald Trump. He says the Republican debates were a turnoff. And he says, Trump isn’t fit to run this country.

Rubio Suspends Campaign After Trump Takes Florida

Mar 15, 2016
Paul Sancya / AP

Republican Marco Rubio of Miami suspended his campaign Tuesday night after losing his home state to Donald Trump.

Trump and Democrat Hillary Clinton were victors in the Florida presidential primary.

Florida was do-or-die for Rubio. Florida's 99 Republican delegates are awarded on a winner-take-all basis.

"While this may not have been the year for an optimistic message, I still remain hopeful and optimistic about America," Rubio told his supporters Tuesday evening.

How Rubio Made Florida A Winner-Take-All State

Mar 13, 2016
CHIP SOMODEVILLA / Getty Images

Florida’s primary on Tuesday could finally decide who will get both the Republican and Democratic presidential nomination.  The Sunshine State's pivotal role in the primary system was no accident, and it may be surprising to find out that the man behind Florida’s winner-take-all primary is Marco Rubio – whose own presidential aspirations may be decided on Tuesday night.

Twitter

 

Presidential elections have always sparked conversation around the dinner table and at news stands. Then, with the growth of media, that conversation spread to every screen and speaker imaginable.

Now, the platform for political talk is social media. And it could very well be changing the structure of the campaign as we know it.

On Feb. 9, 26-year-old Carolina Herlle shared this video on her Facebook page:

After one more debate among the Republican contenders for president, the postgame conversation was once again dominated by Donald Trump's behavior.

But for once, it was about his good behavior. He did not shout or fulminate, nor did he pout or belittle his opponents or joust with the moderators.

Pedro Portal / Miami Herald

The Republican presidential candidates gathered at the University of Miami for its last debate before the Florida primary on Tuesday.

U.S.-CUBA RELATIONS

America’s changing relationship with Cuba was part of the discussion at last night’s Republican primary debate.

Donald Trump said he doesn’t agree entirely with President Barack Obama’s diplomatic openings with Cuba, but something needs to change.

“After 50 years, it’s enough time, folks," said Trump. But we have to make a good deal.”

The fight to improve wages for Florida's tomato pickers hit the national stage over the past week, as part of the race for the Democratic presidential nomination.

Patrick Farrell / Miami Herald

One day after splitting the primaries in Michigan and Mississippi — and less than a week before the Florida Primary — Democratic presidential candidates Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders debated Wednesday night in front of an enthusiastic and engaged audience at Miami-Dade College's Kendall campus, which Clinton referred to as "the largest college in North America."

Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton had another tense debate Wednesday night in Miami, less than a week before crucial primary contests on March 15.

The latest face-off between the two came as the Vermont senator was riding high from an unexpected victory Tuesday in Michigan. The two clashed over immigration reform, U.S.-Cuba relations and Wall Street policy, and debated their electoral strategy going forward.

Next Tuesday, voters from Florida, Ohio, Missouri, North Carolina and Illinois will cast their ballots.

Mandel Ngan / AFP/Getty Images

Democrat Hillary Clinton and Republican Donald Trump hold hefty leads as next week's presidential primaries loom in Florida --- a potentially ominous sign for home-state GOP candidate Marco Rubio, according to a poll released Wednesday.

Clinton, the former secretary of state, leads Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders by a margin of 62 percent to 32 percent among likely Florida Democratic voters. Trump, meanwhile, leads Rubio by a margin of 45 percent to 22 percent, with Texas Republican Sen. Ted Cruz at 18 percent, the Quinnipiac University poll shows.

Washington Post

Two presidential debates are coming to Miami this week.

Republican candidates will debate at the University of Miami Thursday night. But first, Democrats will take the stage Wednesday night at the Kendall campus of Miami Dade College.

Twenty-one mayors – most of them from South Florida – sent a letter to the moderators for both debates. The mayors want the candidates to explain how they plan to deal with climate change and sea level rise.

Gina Jordan/WLRN

House minority leader Mark Pafford, D-West Palm Beach, is finishing up his last regular legislative session.

He's leaving because of term limits. "This process is better when you have new minds and fresh ideas," Pafford says. For the record, he doesn't like term limits and calls his departure an "involuntary constitutional resignation." 

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