poetry

Essay

Dwyane Wade is leaving. After 13 years with the Miami Heat, Wade is leaving the only NBA team he has known. He’s leaving, like LeBron James did two years ago, to return home. In Wade’s case, he’s headed to the Chicago Bulls -- a team he grew up with as a kid in the southern suburbs of that city.

Chicago is a city I spent almost 15 years in before moving to South Florida. Like Wade, I know both places well. They are both special places for those of us lucky to have lived and love them both.

  Miami is the Magic City.

Lynnette Cantos

At the beginning of each performance, Speakfridays host and founder Robert Lee starts  by reciting to newcomers and regulars alike the night’s catchphrase:

“Can I speak?,” Lee shouts. And the audience responds  with a resounding, “Yes you can.”  Started in 2006, Speakfridays has been a staple of Miami’s underground art and culture scene for the last 10 years. Originally located in a warehouse in the Bird Road Arts district, the show moved to Wynwood last year in search of  larger accommodations.

What is it

About this place

With

Sound and stories…

So salty.

That’s our ZipOde, a poetic ode to our zip code here at the studios in Miami: 33132.

Your zip determines the number of words in each line of the poem. So, for us, that’s three words, then three words, one word, three and two.

With our partner O, Miami poetry festival, we asked you to memorialize your own federally appointed numerical designation by writing ZipOdes.

More than 1,100 poems came in and they were a lot of fun to read.

Joyce Tenneson

When President Obama was sworn into office for his second term in January 2013, it was Miami-raised writer Richard Blanco who read the inaugural poem.

He was the first Latino and first openly gay inaugural poet in U.S.  history. And now Blanco, a child of Cuban immigrants, will put his poetic stamp on another historic event -- the re-opening of a U.S. embassy in Havana, Cuba.

Blanco, now a resident of Maine, was chosen to read his new poem during the re-opening ceremony before a crowd of Cuban officials and U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry.

Lisann Ramos

Elementary students in Liberty City are getting lessons from a professional poet through the O, Miami poetry festival.

For four weeks students at Orchard Villa Elementary are getting a crash course in poetry from an actual poet.

“This is my first time knowing about poetry, and it is fun. And I get to write my own poetry stories and we could talk about our family,” said Kindra Oriental, a third grader.

Oriental is one of the students in the third grade class learning from poet Laurel Nakanishi.

Share A Poem In Braille With O, Miami

Apr 15, 2015
O,Miami

Secret Sonnets is an O, Miami poetry festival project that translates poems into braille.

The author sends a poem to South Plantation High School student Connor Grey. Connor uses a text-to- speech program to hear the poem and transcribe it on a braille typewriter. He also enlists the help of his school's braille club as well as volunteers from Lighthouse Miami and Lighthouse Broward. 

The braille poems are anonymously sent to a recipient of the author’s choosing in Miami-Dade County.

Connor Grey started this project to spread awareness about the blind community.

LeBron's Move In 9 Haikus

Jul 15, 2014
Hialeah Haikus / Courtesy

We read your haiku
about LeBron James leaving.
Thanks for the poems.

In 2010, WLRN and the Miami Herald collected poems to welcome the arrival of LeBron James to the Miami Heat. It's fitting to say goodbye to one of the Heat's celebrated players in verse again.

Fans from all over the Heat Nation shared their disappointment, their understanding and their (mostly) well wishes for James' new journey. Here are nine haikus that are our favorites.

Say Goodbye To LeBron James With A Haiku

Jul 11, 2014
Gregory Castillo / Courtesy

LeBron James' decision to leave the Miami Heat and join the Cleveland Cavaliers has left plenty of South Floridians with mixed feelings.

WLRN and the Miami Herald held a poetry contest welcoming James to Miami. Now it's time to say goodbye.

Would you like to say goodbye to LeBron James in a haiku? Submit your three lines through the Public Insight Network.

Poet, performer and political activist Maya Angelou has died after a long illness at her home in Winston-Salem, N.C. She was 86. Born in St. Louis in 1928, Angelou grew up in a segregated society that she worked to change during the civil rights era. Angelou, who refused to speak for much of her childhood, revealed the scars of her past in I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings, the first of a series of memoirs.

Mark Hedden

This is where the end of the #ThisIsWhere poetry submissions snuck up on us. For weeks we've been awash in a sea of words, poetic descriptions of everything from sunrises to lizards to — in this week's selection — a blessed urinal. And now we've suddenly found ourselves at the far shore, maybe a little wiser, but definitely more compelled to think of things in extended metaphors.

Margaretta K. Mitchell

The poet Robert Hass headlines the O, Miami Poetry Festival at the New World Center on South Beach tomorrow night (Saturday, April 5). Anyone can watch on the Wallcast from the park just outside the building.

Kelley Mitchell

It was the Everglades that brought out the poet in Coral Gables High School student James Lachterman.

And in under 20 lines of rhyme, the then 15-year-old was able to capture a prize in the Miami-Dade Public Library System’s contest for teen poets.

And now, with April and National Poetry Month upon us again, the search is on for the next winners. Young adults from the ages of 12-19 are eligible, with a valid library card, of course.

This year’s theme is technology.

American Stamp Dealers Association

There are many ways to send a Valentine's Day greeting in 2014 -- text, email, social media.

But in 1857, there weren't so many.

A passionate love letter from Samuel Eager to Clara Dwight Marsh is being displayed at the Greater Fort Lauderdale/Broward Convention Center.

The Sun Sentinel reports that the tiny letter along with a rare stamp is on display at the American Stamp Dealers Association convention.

fallsapart.com

02/03/14 - 1:30 -Literary contributor Ariel Gonzalez with Native American writer Sherman Alexie.  He’s praised for his prolific production of both poetry and fiction. His latest publication is BLASPHEMY, a collection of his short stories

Richard Blanco: The Poem Not Taken

Dec 27, 2013
Richard_Blanco.com

Miami-raised poet Richard Blanco had planned to take his partner to President Barack Obama’s second inauguration to sit on the platform as he read the poem he composed for the event.

He could only have one guest. But his partner had another idea, Blanco says.

“He says, ‘It should really be your mom to go with with you. This is so much more about the American Dream story.'”

So Blanco picked up the phone to call his mother to ask her if she even wanted to go.

Pages