photography

On Sunday, Jamaican sprinter Usain Bolt won the men's 100 meters in Rio, retaining his status as the fastest man in the world.

One photo from the day visually defines the career of this record-breaking athlete. It's from the semifinals.

In it, Bolt is leading the pack. He glances over his left shoulder, grinning, just before he crosses the finish line. His competitors are barely nipping at his heels. Everything below the waist is a blur.

Tim Chapman

  When photographer Tim Chapman retired from The Miami Herald in 2012, he had an archive dating back 40 years. Chapman documented some of the most significant moments in South Florida history. Now, he's found a home for that archive, at the HistoryMiami museum. That donation — and Chapman's career — is celebrated in a show called Newsman now on display at the museum.

  Chapman said he never changed over his 40-year career, even as photographic technology and the newspaper business changed dramatically.

Why Is Food So Beautiful?

May 11, 2016
Donna Muccio

At around 10 a.m. on any weekend morning, a line will start to form outside the popular Wynwood pop-up donut shop the Salty Donut. The shop has gained momentum through social media photos of its eclectic donuts. The woman behind many of those photos is Donna Muccio, who also photographs for another Miami restaurant, DIRT.

 

The Man Behind The New Everglades Forever Stamp

Apr 15, 2016

The National Park Service is turning 100 this year. To celebrate, the Postal Service created a set of Forever Stamps showcasing 16 national parks. One of them is Everglades National Park. 

The photographer of the Everglades stamp is Miami native Paul Marcellini. We spoke with Marcellini about the immortalization of his photograph. 

Can you tell me about your history with the Everglades?

Courtesy of Fusion

For the most part, mug shots are not a good thing, marked by bad lighting, slightly grainy resolution and a not-so-happy model. And yet, we seem to have a fascination with them in pop culture -- galleries of celebrity mug shots, hot mug shots and, of course, the most unflattering ones imaginable.

Noted Civil Rights-Era Photographer Bob Adelman Found Dead At Miami Beach Home

Mar 20, 2016
Patrick Farrell / Miami Herald

  Bob Adelman, a photographer considered one of the foremost chroniclers of the civil rights movement, was found dead in his Miami Beach home Saturday by a friend who called police.

Miami Beach police would not confirm the identity of the elderly man whose body was in the house, saying they had not yet notified the family, but the county's medical examiner's website identified the dead man as Adelman, misspelled as Adelman.

A Miami Beach official with knowledge of the investigation said Adelman, 85, was found with a head wound.

Jeffrey Cardenas/Yanela Piñeiro

  The photo exhibit "Cómo lo vemos a Usted (y cómo nos ven)" was already under way when Cuba and the United States announced last December that the two countries would resume diplomatic relations.

The show -- in English, "How We See You (And How You See Us)"  — opened nine days after that historic announcement, showing at National Museum of Fine Arts in Havana. On Thursday, Oct. 1, it opens for its first showing in the U.S., at The Studios of Key West.

Arthur Rothstein / Arthur Rothstein Archive

Arthur Rothstein was a young man in the 1930s. He originally wanted to be a doctor. But it was the Depression and he went to work for the Farm Security Administration, documenting American workers and the conditions they faced.

In 1938, that assignment took him to Key West. The city suffered more than most in the Depression, declaring bankruptcy and essentially handing itself over to the state. The state, in turn, brought in a New Deal administrator who decided the island should remake itself as a tourist mecca.

Courtesy NSU Art Museum Fort Lauderdale

The photographs we see from Haiti usually evoke misery – especially after the country’s catastrophic 2010 earthquake. But anyone who has been to Haiti, of course, knows that’s hardly the whole picture.

Wynwood Pop-Up Exhibits Student-Shot Everyday Portraits

Dec 3, 2014
Gregory Castillo / WLRN

    

On a warm afternoon in Wynwood, just minutes away from their homes in Allapattah and Overtown, a group of students is making images. 

The group, 25 students selected by the Play to Win Foundation, is part of the program's Through My Lens: Art Is Life workshop. The mission is to empower students through art. 

Students paired with mentors spent all day on Nov. 8 crafting their photography skills. Armed with state-of-the-art Nokia phones, they snapped photos of each other in front of murals. 

Image Courtesy of Jenny Romney / IPC Visual Lab

For over 25 years, Carl Juste has frozen time.   

With the shutter of his lens, the veteran Miami Herald photojournalist has documented the days and lives of those who live in and around South Florida. But now, Juste is changing things, putting the cameras in the hands of a new generation and showing them how visual stories are told.

A group 10 advanced photojournalism students will show off 10 weeks' worth of work, illustrating the vibrant colors that make up life in South Florida.

Courtesy

  California-based photographer Sunny Bak is best known for her work with musicians such as the Beastie Boys. Her iconic images are now on display at Studio 18 in Pembroke Pines.

Silvia Ros

For the last few years, photographing some of the biggest events in the LGBT community was more than just a job for Silvia Ros. It's personal.

This story originally ran on June 28, 2013.

One day back in 1954, photographer Bunny Yeager snapped photographs of the then unknown Bettie Page posing in front of a Christmas tree. Those images, featuring the now-renowned naughty-but-nice appeal of Page, were sold to Playboy. Almost overnight, those photos catapulted both women's careers.

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