Palm Beach

Christine DiMattei

A wry symbol on a text message.

Last fall, that was the first inkling Lynn University President Kevin Ross had that his school would be making the history books.

“I was out at lunch and got a text that said, ‘You need to come back to campus immediately,’" recalls Ross.  “And it was with a smiley-face after it. So I knew it was good.”

Lynn University

A week from today, news outlets from all over the world are expected to converge upon Boca Raton's Lynn University for the third and final Presidential Debate of 2012.

And it looks like some foreign journalists won't be needing their pocket English dictionaries as much as they thought.

International students from more than 80 countries make up nearly a quarter of Lynn's student body. University officials say they've worked hard to locate students who will be able to serve as translators.

AP

A misprint on 60,000 absentee ballots means vote-counting in Palm Beach County will be sort of special again this year.

Supervisor of Elections Susan Bucher said each of those ballots will have to be examined, the intent of each voter discerned, and the vote transferred to a properly printed ballot so it can be read by a tabulation scanner.

Justin Smiley/flickr.com

When it comes to clean energy projects like wind farms, where people stand on a proposal sometimes depends on where they sit. Take the case of the late Sen. Edward Kennedy, certainly a champion of green causes — until someone proposed building a wind farm off Cape Cod, where the liberal lion liked to do his sailing.

He fought the wind farm until he died.

Flickr/Dean Terry

A controversial agreement between Palm Beach County and developers is finally producing reduced-price homes for low- to middle-income families.

It’s just not happening fast enough.

In 2006, at the height of South Florida’s building boom, the county decided to set aside affordable housing for its workforce.  So it struck what sounded like a sweet deal for developers: they could build more houses than usual within certain areas, provided they knock down some prices. 

A New Yorker's Commute on South Florida Public Transit

Jul 31, 2012
Bob B. Brown (Flickr)

South Florida is clearly a car-centered part of the country, but there are a lot of people here who rely on public transportation. This summer, WLRN intern Luc Cohen was one of them.  

Cohen, who is majoring in public and international affairs at Princeton University, was born and raised in New York City. So for him, public transportation is practically second nature.

Before coming to Miami for his internship, Cohen had driven a total of six blocks by himself in his life.

Arts Garage

On any given weekend, you might walk by The Old School Square parking garage in Delray Beach and hear the sounds of jazz or blues or classical music wafting from the ground floor.

It’s an innovative venue known as the 'Arts Garage' and, yes, the rest of the building is actually devoted to cradling cars.

But the ground floor is where all the action is.

No vehicles there, no take-a-ticket machines, no yellow lines, no parking attendants to be seen, mostly live music in a 5500 square foot garage.

Flickr/breezy421

Some South Florida cities were born beaches -- others just kind of decided to become beaches.

In recent years, several cities have attempted to raise their profiles and attract tourists by tacking a "Beach" onto the end of their names.

Weird Florida Day 6: JFK Bunker in Palm Beach

May 27, 2012

The Kennedy Bunker on Peanut Island in Palm Beach was really amazing. It was like a this huge tin cylinder 27 feet underground and could house 30 people for 30 days comfortably. Complete with an escape hatch and a helipad it was designed to protect President John F. Kennedy in the event of attack.

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