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Three Things To Know This Hurricane Season

Jun 19, 2015
NASA/Rob Gutro / Flickr

For five months each year, the warm climate that makes Florida famous creates the ideal conditions for storms to brew. Florida hasn’t been directly hit by a hurricane in 10 years, and roughly two weeks into hurricane season the tropics seem quiet. So far.

Still, residents and emergency responders alike must be prepared for any extreme weather. Representatives from Florida Power and Light, the National Hurricane Center and the Department of Public Safety recently met in West Palm Beach to discuss what’s expected this hurricane season and what residents need to know to stay safe.

Greenpeace USA/flickr

A study on the effects of climate change forecasts the widespread bleaching of coral reefs sooner than expected. Corals in the Dry Tortugas are among those at risk. 

Any change in normal conditions, like unusually warm water, can cause corals to release algae from their tissues. These algae give corals their color and provide their primary source of food.

Catlin Seaview Survey

South Florida's coral reefs are getting ready for their close-up.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration is teaming up with the Catlin Seaview Survey as part of the Australia-based project's ambitious effort to create a photographic record of the world's coral reefs.

As the Sun Sentinel reports:

NOAA

Climate scientists largely agree that sea level is rising. The extent of the change is a far more complicated matter.

“Probably two feet. Three feet, possibly,” said David Enfield, a climatologist with the University of Miami and the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration. “As an extreme -- if for example we see an unexpected acceleration of the melting ice in Greenland and Antarctica, something else we’re not observing -- we could be seeing six feet by the end of the century.”

Climate Change Could Ruin Snorkeling And Fishing In Florida

Mar 11, 2013
NOAA / Flickr Creative Commons

The future of some of Florida's smallest and most seldom seen inhabitants is under threat from climate change, and that could spell big trouble further up the food chain, scientists say. South Florida's coral and algae populations are declining as ocean temperatures rise and there's an economic factor to consider, according to researchers who study the coastal underwater ecosystems.