Nicolas Maduro

An invitation for Venezuelan leader Nicolas Maduro to attend the Summit of the Americas has been withdrawn after the Latin American country's decision to hold early presidential elections – a move seen as all but shutting out the opposition.

In a terse statement on Tuesday, Peru's Foreign Minister Cayetana Aljovin said Maduro's "presence will no longer be welcome" at the Summit of the Americas, a regional policy gathering scheduled this year to be held in Lima in April.

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COMMENTARY

A lot of Venezuelans who oppose their authoritarian socialist regime are into self-flagellation at the moment. They feel guilty because they didn’t rally behind rebel cop Oscar Pérez – whom authorities killed last week – until it was too late.

Ariana Cubillos / AP via Miami Herald

Over the past year, much of the world has begun talking about Venezuela more as a dictatorship than as a democracy. The socialist regime in that oil-rich South American country hoped to change that Tuesday by announcing it will hold a presidential election by the end of April.

But it didn't exactly hear worldwide applause.

Richard Drew / AP

COMMENTARY

Let’s make one thing crystal clear: Rafael Ramírez is no hero. Venezuela’s former oil czar is almost as complicit in the country’s economic and democratic ruin as President Nicolás Maduro is.

AP via Miami Herald

COMMENTARY

It’s hard to exaggerate what a repugnant U.S. Senate candidate Judge Roy Moore of Alabama was. Right-wing bigot. Mean-spirited homophobe. Alleged pedophile. An intolerant theocrat who rode to the polls Tuesday on horseback to highlight the antediluvian past he and his followers want to drag us back to.

AP via Miami Herald

COMMENTARY

For those of us who favor loosening the screws on Cuba but tightening the screws on Venezuela, this week presents a nagging question: At what point do we become guilty of a double standard?

Venezuela’s regime just made an announcement that should cause some geopolitical navel-gazing in that regard. To wit: the ruling socialists, or Chavistas, said they’re considering not holding presidential elections next year as long as the U.S. keeps its financial sanctions against Venezuela in place.

Odalis Garcia / WLRN

“Venezuela is between any meridian and parallel of the world,” said Antonio Ledezma, quoting Venezuelan poet Rafael Cadenas, to a crowded room of those in the Venezuelan diaspora gathered at Florida International University (FIU) on Friday, Dec. 1.

Ledezma called for a unified diaspora to help in the fight against Maduro's regime. "We must understand, that when dealing with this kind of regime, unity is a powerful thing," he said.

Ronald Zak / AP via Miami Herald

Oil is Venezuela’s only real economic asset, accounting for more than 95 percent of its export revenues. But its oil industry has been wrecked by neglect and corruption. The government is now purging that industry’s leadership. But it’s probably too late.

They say oil is as much a curse to Venezuela as it is a blessing. The South American country has the world’s largest oil reserves. But its oil wealth has long been looted by corrupt ruling elites. Or, in this century, by a corrupt socialist revolution.

Ariana Cubillos / AP

Two things happened last week that gave hope to opponents of Venezuela’s socialist regime – especially to Venezuelan exiles in South Florida.

Fernando Llano / AP via Miami Herald

COMMENTARY

When right-wing military tyrant Augusto Pinochet ruled Chile in the 1970s and 80s, a then-democratic Venezuela gave refuge to Chilean opposition exiles who'd been targeted for prison or “disappearance” under his brutal dictatorship.

Ariana Cubillos / AP via Miami Herald

Political conditions in Venezuela are growing darker by the day. But so is Venezuela’s financial situation. In the meantime, Florida politicians are calling for more help for Venezuelan immigrants.

Much of the international community now labels Venezuela’s socialist government a dictatorship. And this week the regime is doing its best to live up to that billing.

Fernando Llano / AP via Miami Herald

COMMENTARY

By now everybody knows the bigly favor President Trump did the Alt-Right this week.

On Tuesday, like a bad parent defending his skinhead bully kid in the principal’s office, Trump insisted the deadly mayhem that torch-carrying white supremacists wrought in Charlottesville, Virginia, over the weekend wasn’t all their fault.

Ariana Cubillos / AP via Miami Herald

The targets on the backs of Venezuelans like Gustavo Marcano grow larger by the day.

Marcano is the mayor of the eastern Venezuelan city of Lechería. Like most places in Venezuela this year, Lechería has been the site of angry anti-government protests as the country’s economy collapses – and as its socialist regime morphs into what critics call a dictatorship.

Tim Padgett / WLRN.org

Now that Venezuela’s socialist government has morphed into what critics call a dictatorship, the regime is out to arrest its political opponents. One of those targeted - Gustavo Marcano - slipped out of Venezuela days ago and is now in South Florida.

Open-Mic Protest In Miami Discusses Venezuelan Crisis

Aug 7, 2017
Adrianne Gonzalez / WLRN News

Saturday morning at Bayside in Miami wasn’t the typical shopping and dining experience. The wall surrounding the Torch of Friendship had a giant Venezuelan flag with signatures and wishes written on the fabric.

There was an open-mic protest, organized by local community members and activists. Cuban-Americans, Venezuelan-Americans, and Venezuelans all took turns sharing stories, opinions, and prayers.

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