Miami

Lorelei Ramirez: College Winner

Mar 18, 2013
Lorelei Ramirez

Lorelei Ramirez was the winner in the College category of Under the Sun‘s unpublished writers competition.

Flagler Street

by Lorelei Ramirez

This is what we’ve got

These

Palm trees

Swaying in the breeze along the

Not the sea or shining sands under the sun but

Swaying

In the middle of streets

Dark paved roads and honking horns and not quite so clean air

Between walking girls and whistling men in dirty white cars

Pickup trucks

And bus

stops.

My Mom Kissed Fidel

Mar 18, 2013
Magda Montiel Davis

This post goes in the “It’s a Small World” category.

Read The Runners-Up (College)

Mar 18, 2013
Sadie Kurzban

In April, we invited unpublished writers to submit their work as part of our Write South Florida contest. There were three categories in the contest: Amateur, College, and Children.  These are the runners-up from the contest in the College category.

Mommy the Commie and Me

by Sadie Kurzban

Richard Fendelman

Hundreds of Miami-Dade middle and high school students listened to “Two Pianos” by Morton Gould. Afterwards, they wrote poems inspired by the music.  It was part of a contest called the Piano Slam.  The point is to inspire young people, using classical music, to create their own forms of artistic expression.

Lindsay Lonano: Kids Winner

Mar 18, 2013

Lindsay Lonano was the winner in the Kids category of Under the Sun‘s unpublished writers competition.

Lindsay Lonano

The Swamp

The green swamp

Bursts open with abundant life.

A slowly moving log appears

Upon the still surface.

Unsuspecting little bird

Unaware a predator lurks.

Munch! Fast moving predator

Eyes atop his head, delighted!

Alas! Not full yet

He slides upon a rabbit.

Prey, gone in a flash

Where did it go. Woe!

Premiere Episode

Mar 18, 2013

In our first episode, you’ll hear the voices of a Holocaust survivor who made pool cues in Miami Beach and a migrant tomato picker who struggles for higher wages in Immokalee.  After losing her son, Queen Brown has taken up the fight to end youth violence, and to make peace in her own family.  Two cat burglars remember how they made off with millions of dollars in jewels from Palm Beach mansions.  The Miracle Fruit Man introduces our co-host Alicia Zuckerman to a magical berry.  A 17-year-old announcer at Dania Jai A-lai hopes to revive a fading sport.  And in our regular “What’s Up With So

Alicia Zuckerman

It’s a time-honored tradition. Spring breakers descend on Miami from across the nation this time of year to guzzle beer, work on their tanlines and hit the clubs.


Or there’s Alternative Spring Break, where you sit in a windowless room, guzzle coffee, and fill out reams of immigration paperwork. You can compile proof of residence, and file for fee waivers. Sound appealing?

Episode 4: Hispanic Versus Latino

Mar 18, 2013
Jose Maya

Dan Grech gets a government form in the mail and he’s asked to decide: Is he Hispanic, or “a big white guy?” He’s pretty sure he’s not Latino.

To sort it all out, he invited demographer Maria Aysa to the studio.

In this piece, she explains the difference between the terms Hispanic and Latino, and why some people are so adamant about using one instead of the other.

Meet Poet Campbell McGrath

Mar 18, 2013
Dan Grech

When you see a book titled Florida Poems, you might imagine titles and verses about bright sunshine and sand-swept beaches, with a picturesque Key West sunset thrown in.  You know, kind of like the poetry version of those generic landscape paintings that hang in every Florida seaside motel? (With the exception of paintings by the Florida Highwaymen, but that’s another story for another time.)

Young Poets

Mar 18, 2013
Nick Vagnoni

Host Alicia Zuckerman was intensely curious about how young poets graduating with Masters of Fine Arts degrees expect to make money.  Since the average poetry journal pays just $20 for a poem, it’s not exactly a way to make a living.   Sure, writing by candlelight because you can’t pay FPL has a certain romance to it, but what happens when you run out of matches?  So how do poets expect to pay their bills?

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