Miami

Meet Poet Campbell McGrath

Mar 18, 2013
Dan Grech

When you see a book titled Florida Poems, you might imagine titles and verses about bright sunshine and sand-swept beaches, with a picturesque Key West sunset thrown in.  You know, kind of like the poetry version of those generic landscape paintings that hang in every Florida seaside motel? (With the exception of paintings by the Florida Highwaymen, but that’s another story for another time.)

Young Poets

Mar 18, 2013
Nick Vagnoni

Host Alicia Zuckerman was intensely curious about how young poets graduating with Masters of Fine Arts degrees expect to make money.  Since the average poetry journal pays just $20 for a poem, it’s not exactly a way to make a living.   Sure, writing by candlelight because you can’t pay FPL has a certain romance to it, but what happens when you run out of matches?  So how do poets expect to pay their bills?

A True Old World Craftsman

Mar 18, 2013
Alicia Zuckerman

For years, billiards aficionados made a kind of pilgrimage to a place called Star Cue. It was a tiny shop just off Fifth Street in South Beach—tucked behind Flower Bazaar, an upscale floral boutique. Holocaust survivor Abe Rich made some of the country’s most coveted pool cues. Tristram Korten stopped in and spoke with Rich shortly before he passed away.

Trina Sargalski

“What’s Up with South Florida?” is our regular segment where we invite listeners to tell us what they find confusing or unusual about South Florida. We took a poll so you could decide what we should investigate. You flocked to the birds. So what’s up with all of those birds congregating at South Florida intersections each evening?  Carey McKearnan finds out.

_BIGM33CH / INSTAGRAM

Post and audio were updated yesterday.  Details at State Impact.

It’s been almost a month since self-appointed neighborhood watch captain George Zimmerman shot and killed Trayvon Martin—an unarmed black teenager from Miami Gardens.

Martin’s death has inspired a national debate about race and justice.

The Biscayne Bay Harbor Pilots

Mar 18, 2013
Arianna Prothero

If you’ve spent time at South Pointe Park in Miami Beach, you might have noticed the steady stream of cruise and cargo ships going in and out of Port Miami.  These hulking ships are one of the signature images of South Florida.

All of these ships are driven in and out of the port by a highly trained group of sea captains, also known as harbor pilots.   Harbor pilots know the waters around the port well–they have to be able to draw a map from memory as part of their qualifications.

Jen Mertens

It had been 38 years since Don Bailey posed for his popular carpet ad – a spoof of a famous Burt Reynolds picture. In March 2010, Under the Sun reporter Sammy Mack convinced Bailey to pose again, wearing exactly the same … smile.

Music Interview: Cayos

Mar 18, 2013
Nick Reyes

Local Band Cayos is an experimental ambient-electronica group. Under the Sun on WLRN had the chance to speak with band members Daniel Laburu and Nick Reyes about what inspires their music.

Both are Miami natives who moved away. Laburu is an architect living in New York.  Reyes is a soldier stationed at Fort Riley in Kansas.

From Alien to Citizen

Mar 18, 2013
Courtesy of Chuck Felix / Freedigitalphotos.net

Immigration officials say there is an often an increase in the number of people applying for U.S. citizenship before a presidential election.

Former Under the Sun producer Ruth Morris is one of those immigrants who wants to become a citizen. For three years, Morris covered South Florida immigration, a beat that can earn you a slew of angry emails.  It can also make you cynical, according to Morris. Some of her readers got angry when she used the term “undocumented workers.” They preferred “illegal aliens.”

 

Joe Mazzola/Flickr

A conference looking at how Miami can become a nebula for technology start-ups is taking place Wednesday at the New World Center on Miami Beach.

Called Start-Up City: Miami, the conference is in part the brain-child of urban studies expert Richard Florida who lives part-time in Miami Beach.

Florida is a senior editor at the Atlantic and runs an institute for the study of economic prosperity at the University of Toronto.

Sammy Mack / WLRN

When Florida sued to overturn the Affordable Care Act, lawmakers targeted a piece of the law that would have forced Florida to make Medicaid available to more than a million uninsured Floridians.

The U. S. Supreme Court upheld most of the act but it made Medicaid expansion optional.

Now some Florida lawmakers who originally opposed Medicaid expansion are seriously considering that option.

How Music Is Coming Back To Overtown

Jan 25, 2013
Overtown Music Project

The Overtown section of Miami was the heart and soul of music during the early to mid-1960’s.

It developed as Southern and Bahamian blacks relocated to Miami area to work on Henry Flagler’s railroad.

As they prospered, so did the club and performing arts scene.

Other venues included the Rockland, Palace, the Harlem Square Club, the Cotton Club, the Ritz Theater, the Mary Elizabeth Hotel and the Sir John, to name a few.

These clubs and theaters featured the great artists such as Count Basie, Ella Fitzgerald, James Brown, Billie Holiday, and Cab Calloway.

Marketplace In Miami: An Economic Roundtable On Miami's Biggest Challenges

Jan 24, 2013
Charlton Thorp / Marketplace

 

Is Miami the city of the future? What economic challenges does it face going forward? Jeremy Hobson hosts a roundtable discussion with Paola Iuspa-Abbott, a reporter with the Daily Business Review, Andrea Heuson, a professor of finance at the University of Miami, and Dan Grech, formerly of Marketplace and now the news director at WLRN Miami Herald News.

One of the questions Marketplace asked: What is the biggest economic problem in South Florida right now? 

Florida we love you, but not the way you drive.

That about sums up the audience reaction to something that Marketplace Morning Report host Jeremy Hobson mentioned on Wednesday morning.


Joe Raedle / Getty Images

Miami is a city made up of people from all walks of life. No one knows that better than Miami Mayor Tomás Regalado.

"Miami is one of the most diverse cities in the world," says the mayor. "Sixty-some percent of people living in Miami were born outside the United States."

Regalado is one of them. Born in Cuba, he came to the United States at age 14. After a distinguished career as a journalist , Regalado was elected mayor in 2009.

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