Miami Marlins

PATRICK FARRELL / Miami Herald

The Miami Marlins have the third lowest payroll at a little more than $71 million. They're only better than the Tampa Bay Rays and the Milwaukee Brewers. And yet, over the past couple of weeks the Marlins have been playing red hot, and only one team has won more games during that period.

But, can the team sustain that level of winning over the long Major League Baseball season? Here is Miami Herald sports reporter Manny Navarro's view:

Credit Creative Commons via Flickr / User Arturo Pardavila III (https://flic.kr/p/ExeF2T)

The Miami Marlins kick off their season Tuesday.

And this year there’s a new guy who will be throwing the opening pitch. In January, Taiwanese baseball player Wei-Yin Chen signed a five-year, $80 million contract with the Miami Marlins. And it seems like his entire home country signed on too.

Ebony Joseph / WLRN

A group of students from the Miami Lighthouse for the Blind and Visually Impaired got a hands-on "touch tour" of Miami Marlins Park on Thursday.

The students from Lighthouse’s summer music camp got a chance to feel and explore the stadium before the Marlins went head to head against the Washington Nationals.

The summer program gives sighted and visually impaired students a chance to work together and learn about each other.

How Chef Vince Navarrete Feeds Marlins Park

Sep 26, 2014
mrlaugh / Flickr

Baseball is “America’s pastime”. The sport is filled with nostalgia and American history from Jackie Robinson and Derek Jeter to the disco demolition and your neighborhood little league team.

But, it’s the food that brings everything together.

Baseball was part of my introduction to American culture growing up. I would listen to games on the radio with my grandfather in Brooklyn, sitting on the porch during the summer eating ice cream or passing around a bag of Funyuns.

L. D. Mooth, Former Photographer - WTVJ-TV Miami

03/27/14 - Thursday's Topical Currents looks at the history of the “Triple A” minor league baseball team named the Miami Marlins. Their home was the friendly confines of the old Miami Stadium from 1956 through 1960. There were colorful characters involved . . . including maverick promoter Bill Veeck, Manager Pepper Martin, even ageless pitching wonder, Satchel Paige.

This Mother-Daughter Team Is The Ultimate Miami Marlins Fan Club

Sep 6, 2013

For the past four years, Eloise Card and her daughter Donna Glendenning have watched every Miami Marlins game together, from first pitch to last out — more than 600 and counting. From 34 miles apart.

“If I don’t call her by the first pitch, she’s calling me,” says Glendenning. “She’ll start out the conversation always with, ‘Well, what do you think we’re going to do tonight?’ ”

Card lives in the Westwood Lakes neighborhood of Southwest Miami-Dade, while her daughter lives in Fort Lauderdale. They started watching Marlins games together telephonically in 2009.

I moved to South Florida in '82 from Canada and immediately became a Dolphin fan and season ticket holder up until 2009. Through that time I saw the privately funded Joe Robbie Stadium get built, and then renovated and subsequently host a couple Super Bowls, which brought great benefits to the local community. I owned a print shop and design firm in Tamarac at the time, and you could literally feel the benefit to the community from there. It seemed that everyone was busy and profitable in and around those Super Bowls with the massive influx of revenue these events brought in.

Editor's Note: WLRN-Miami Herald News asked members of the Public Insight Network to respond to the news that South Florida would not host Super Bowl 50 and 51.   

Editor's Note: WLRN-Miami Herald News asked members of the Public Insight Network to respond to the news that South Florida would not host Super Bowl 50 and 51.   

Original photo from Miami Dolphins with added pizzazz by Kenny Malone

We're a little over two weeks away from the scheduled Miami-Dade County referendum on proposed upgrades to the Miami Dolphins' Sun Life Stadium.

State lawmakers still need to approve a local hotel tax increase and a Dolphins subsidy that would help pay for the renovations. If that happens, the public will have a chance to officially vote on the upgrades on May 14th. 

Until then, we figured we'd give our audience a different way to express their feelings on the issue:

Wiki Commons

SunLife Stadium, which I will forever lovingly call Joe Robbie Stadium, in honor of the man who built it, on his own, with no public funding, is in need of some sprucing up. The current owner is asking for public money to help in this endeavor. A public that is very wary of rich team owners asking for financial help—think Marlins.

So, is this a replay of a Greek tragedy?

Should Public Money Fund Sun Life Stadium Upgrades?

Jan 18, 2013
techyourpicture

Marlins are no help for Dolphins.  The proposal by the Miami Dolphins to fund approximately $400 million in stadium renovations through county hotel taxes and state general funds is not getting a warm reception.  And it’s probably not because of reports by economists showing that events like the Super Bowl don’t contribute significantly to the host communities

Nathan Rupert (flickr)

South Florida businessman Norman Braman is calling the  proposed plan to renovate Sun Life Stadium with the public dollars "plain welfare for a multi-billionaire."

He contends that Miami Dolphins owner Shephen Ross’ football team is a private asset and should not receive any public money. 

Matt Velazquez (Flickr)

The Miami Dolphins' proposed deal to use state and local tax dollars to renovate Sun Life stadium is getting some big endorsements.

But the  benefits a renovated stadium would bring  the county are questionable, some economists say.

Wikimedia

Miami Dolphins owner Stephen Ross has an appointment with reporters today to discuss his plans to go after public funding to renovate Sun Life Stadium.

The cost estimate is $400 million, says the Miami Herald, some of which Ross apparently hopes to raise from state and local government sources.

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