Miami International Airport

AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee

 

"We need to keep as many weapons out of the airport as possible."

Emilio González knows about weapons at airports. He's a military veteran. He's a concealed weapons permit holder. And he's the boss at Florida's busiest passenger airport -- Miami International Airport.

 

Tom MacKenzie / USFWS

When most of us think of Miami International Airport, we don't think of scorpions, sloths, sharks or spiders.

But it turns out the airport is kind of a zoo. Because in addition to being one of the United States' busiest passenger airports, MIA is one of the busiest American airports for importing animals and animal products.

Michal Kranz/WLRN

If you are scheduled to take a flight from Miami International Airport this Friday, you should check with your airline for delays. Services are expected to be affected by a 24 hours strike declared Thursday morning by the subcontractors of Triangle Services, who are complaining about irregular work hours without overtime pay or benefits, as well as dangerous working conditions, most of which stem from faulty equipment.

 

Amanda Rabines

Most flights for Todd Carte are work related. The Quicken Loans executive travels often for his job and has little patience for airport security checkpoints.

“You wait forever, and that’s what I’m getting ready to do,” Carte said on his way to a flight at Miami International Airport. “It stinks.”

Waiting in line is one of the most unpleasant parts of traveling, but help is on the way, at least at Miami International Airport.

Dirk Waem | AFP | Getty Images

The attack on Brussels Airport has forced all airports around the globe to tighten up security and be even more vigilant. MIA is no different. 

What happened immediately after the attacks?

First of all, we kicked in gear immediately when the news reports started coming in. Like we did with Glasgow, we don't wait to be told whether we need to heighten our security or not. We intuitively at MIA come together immediately and put forward-leaning measures in place that we can sustain to rachet up security at MIA.

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Prayitno (https://flic.kr/p/ehWoY6)

Last year was a record breaking year for Miami International Airport.

The airport saw its busiest year ever in 2015 when the 44 millionth passengers walked into the airport.

“You know, that’s the size of some South American countries in one year,” says Greg Chin, communications director for the Miami-Dade Aviation Department. “So we’re really proud of what happened,  and to grow by almost 10 percent was really amazing for us.”

Wilson Sayre / WLRN

  Five-year-old Brian Eberhardt sits watching cartoons at gate D7 at Miami International Airport.

But he’s not watching them on a phone, a tablet or even the television hanging from the ceiling. The cartoons are being projected from an old-school, 16mm reel-to-reel projector.

“It looks like a camera off a TV,” says Brian, who has never seen anything like the projector in real life.

The machine lights up a portable projection screen with Goofy and Donald Duck episodes from the 1950s.

Julia Duba

Broward County commissioners are considering a proposal that would extend the county’s living-wage ordinance to airport contract workers at Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport.

Workers such as baggage handlers, skycaps and wheelchair assistants earn an average of $7.46 per hour, according to a union report.

Gueldere Guerillis has worked at FLL for eight years and currently works two jobs, as a skycap and wheelchair attendant.

“Our paychecks cannot cover everything,” says Guerillis. “Most of us at the airport work two or three jobs to make ends meet.”

Tri-Rail's New Miami Station Off To Rocky Start

Apr 7, 2015
Hector Gabino / Miami Herald

The launch to Tri-Rail's new stop at the Miami International Airport was off to a rocky launch last week.

The new station eliminates the need to travel by shuttle from the Hialeah station to get to the airport, saving passengers about 20 minutes. But some passengers who expected a short trip to the airport, experienced delays of up to an hour.

South Florida Regional Transportation Authority spokesperson Bonnie Arnold says the issue came from Tri-Rail running its own dispatch and maintenance of the track. It was formerly run by CSX Transportation in Jacksonville.

Junette Reyes / WLRN

Miami International Airport is acting Cupid as Valentine’s Day approaches, receiving and shipping over 90 percent of flowers imported to the United States.

The overwhelming number of flower shipments from South America and other regions bring up concerns of pests and plant diseases for the nation’s agricultural and floral industries.

Together, the Miami-Dade Aviation Department, LAN Cargo, and U.S. Customs and Border Protection go through an annual inspection process to prevent the industries from being harmed.

Jessica Meszaros / WLRN

Miami International Airport restaurant workers settled on a contract with their employer Monday after a majority of union members voted to go on strike on Dec. 12.

The vote came about because employees were taking on more of their health care costs.

Miami International Airport Workers Voting To Strike

Dec 12, 2014
Jessica Meszaros / WLRN

  Miami International Airport restaurant workers have been without a contract for about seven months. They want higher pay and better health care benefits.

Over 50 people rallied in front of Terminal E Departures at the airport Friday. They gathered HMS Host employee signatures from 7 a.m to 8 p.m.

Today on WLRN-Miami Herald News, you heard:

How MIA Spots Human Traffickers And Their Victims

Jan 30, 2014
freedigitalphotos.net

The Code Kristi program at Miami International Airport to spot human traffickers and their victims has been in place since 2012. It all came about when Ken Pyatt, the Deputy Director of Miami-Dade County's Aviation Department, and in charge of security, attended a fundraiser for Kristi House. Kristi House is the county's child-advocacy arm that focuses on getting help for sexually abused children. At the fundraiser was a young girl who once had been trafficked and exploited for sex. She described how she was be forced in and out of a

WALTER MICHOT / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

 

Old technology — but new to many Miami-Dade County taxis — is coming to local cabs.

An overwhelming majority of county commissioners signed off Tuesday on sweeping legislation requiring all cabs to take credit cards and install SunPass transponders, GPS devices and digital security cameras.

Drivers will have six months to install SunPass. Credit-card machines will be required in two years. GPS and backseat security cameras will be required in 30 months.

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