Miami Heat

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

By now, you might have heard, for the second straight year the Miami Heat are NBA champions.

INSKEEP: They defeated the San Antonio Spurs 95-to-88 in Game 7 in Miami. The Heat's LeBron James scored 37 points on his way to a second consecutive MVP award.

MONTAGNE: NPR's Mike Pesca was at the game and he has this report.

I am a Miamian. Miami is and will always be my hometown. I graduated from Miami Central High School, Miami Dade Junior College and Florida Atlantic University. And basketball is and will always be my favorite sport. My only son is a 23-year-old named Michael Jordan Sheer, which means he got his name before Jordan got any rings.

The Birdman Cometh And The Heat Fans Loveth

Jun 13, 2013
Phil Latzman

Chris “Birdman” Andersen was circling the NBA’s proverbial trash heap when he was picked up by the Heat in January. And no one could have predicted the impact he would have for the defending champs in the coming months.

The story of his NBA reclamation may even beg for a script.

“That’s already a movie. That’s Back to the Future ain't it?” quips the festooned Andersen after a recent practice.

Sports Illustrated.

Poor Tiago Splitter. He tried so hard to make a teeny dunk. When the Spurs starting center went up to throw one down on Lebron James with eight minutes left in the fourth quarter, the Brazilian got waxed.

Two plays later Lebron slammed a two-handed dunk off a steal, and it was at that moment you knew the Heat were relentlessly swarming, like a school of frenzied piranhas, and they would not be defeated. Not there and not then.

Big Lead Sports

The opening sequence of last night’s NBA finals game against the San Antonio Spurs summed up the Miami Heat’s 2013 season under the big three of Lebron James, Chris Bosh, and Dwyane Wade.

An electrifying dunk by Dwyane Wade followed by nine unanswered points and then a grinding hustle to get back in the game. We, as fans, must live and die with the unremitting arc of sports narrative and the sorrowful nosedives of emotion. The 2013 Miami Heat are like Agony and Ecstasy coming over for a dinner party to your apartment. 

Editor's Note: WLRN-Miami Herald News asked members of the Public Insight Network to respond to the news that South Florida would not host Super Bowl 50 and 51.   

Cubantata on Instagram

When devastation on the scale of what we are seeing in Oklahoma City hits, the whole world feels the pain.

Especially in Miami, where we have had our city leveled and destroyed at various times in our history, notably Hurricane Andrew in August of 1992, which we recently revisited in a radio documentary.

LeBron James is arguably the best player in the NBA. His salary is $17.5 million a year. He's worth much, much more.

"He's getting hosed," says Kevin Grier, an economist from the University of Oklahoma.

James used to play for the Cleveland Cavaliers. When he left, the value of the team fell by tens of millions of dollars — and the value of his new team, the Miami Heat, rose by tens of millions. The economists I talked to said James should be making closer to $40 million a year.

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